Surgery for adult laryngeal papillomatosis

Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis is a viral (human papillomavirus) disease that causes the growth of epithelial verrucous lesions. Patients with laryngeal papillomatosis undergo multiple surgeries due to the tendency of the lesions to reoccur and cause recurrent voice and breathing problems. The goal of the surgical treatment is to remove the lesions while protecting the delicate layered structure of the vocal folds in order to prevent scarring and permanent damage to the mucosa. This is a review of the currently performed operative procedures for treating recurrent adult laryngeal papillomatosis.
Source: Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 26 October 2019Source: Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck SurgeryAuthor(s): Adi Primov-Fever, Ory MadgarRecurrent laryngeal papillomatosis is a viral (human papillomavirus) disease that causes the growth of epithelial verrucous lesions. Patients with laryngeal papillomatosis undergo multiple surgeries due to the tendency of the lesions to reoccur and cause recurrent voice and breathing problems. The goal of the surgical treatment is to remove the lesions while protecting the delicate layered structure of the vocal folds in order to prevent scarring and permanent damage t...
Source: Operative Techniques in Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Abstract Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is characterized by benign exophytic lesions of the respiratory tract caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular low-risk HPV6 and HPV11. Aggressiveness varies greatly among patients. Surgical excision is the current standard of care for RRP, with adjuvant therapy used when surgery cannot control disease recurrence. Numerous adjuvant therapies have been used to control RRP with some success, but none are curative. Current literature supports a polarization of the adaptive immune response to a TH 2-like or T-regulatory phenotype, driven by a complex i...
Source: Clinical and Developmental Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Immunol Source Type: research
AbstractSquamous papillomas (SPs) of the head and neck are generally regarded as a human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven process, but reported rates of HPV detection vary dramatically. Moreover, they are generally considered a benign condition, but the detection of high risk HPV types is commonly reported. This latter finding is particularly disturbing to clinicians and their patients given the alarming rise of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. The capriciousness of HPV detection reflects in large part differences in methodologies. The purpose of this study was to review an institutional experience using a state of the art ...
Source: Head and Neck Pathology - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The American Journal of Dermatopathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis report emphasizes the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis in patients with papillomata, and obtaining comprehensive histopathologic evaluation of lesions in multiple subsites in order to rule out inverted papilloma or overt malignant transformation, particularly if high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes are identified.Level of evidence4
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionsAvelumab demonstrated safety and clinical activity in patients with laryngeal RRP. Further study of immune checkpoint blockade for RRP, possibly with longer treatment duration or in combination with other immunotherapies aimed at activating antiviral immunity, is warranted.Trial registrationNCT, numberNCT02859454, registered August 9, 2016.
Source: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion: LPR may be a risk factor for JORRP, contributing to its development by activating or reactivating a latent HPV infection. Results are in accordance with those from our previous study in adults. PMID: 30881982 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Abstract Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by susceptibility to beta-genus human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Owing to TMC6/EVER1 and TMC8/EVER2 mutations that lead to abnormal transmembrane channels in the endoplasmic reticulum involved in immunological pathways, keratinocytes cannot combat infection from non-pathogenic HPV strains. Mutations involving RHOH, MST-1, CORO1A, and IL-7 have also been associated with EV in patients without TMC6 or TMC8 mutations. We highlight a 27-year-old man with multiple violaceous flat-topped papules with scale and irreg...
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Nivolumab appears to have promising activity in JO-RRP, and further clinical investigation with more patients in clinical trials is warranted. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: To the authors' knowledge, this article is the first report describing clinical activity with a programed cell death-1 (PD-1) inhibitor to treat a rare but detrimental type of respiratory tract epithelial neoplasm that afflicts young adults. Two patients were treated, and tumor features, such as mutational load, were examined with the intent to stimulate future hypotheses for translational research. The safety and activity of PD-1 inhibito...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncologist Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe results show the implication of HPV6 and HPV11 in laryngeal papillomatosis in Burkina Faso with a high prevalence.
Source: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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