French Researchers Building Massive New Scanner to Tackle Brain Disease French Researchers Building Massive New Scanner to Tackle Brain Disease

French researchers are developing what they say will be the most powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner in the world, which will use a supermagnet the weight of a blue whale and should allow earlier diagnosis of diseases such as Parkinson's.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Cognitive impairment is a common feature in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other α-synucleinopathies as 80% of PD patients develop dementia within 20 years. Early cognitive changes in PD patients present as a dysexecutive syndrome, broadly characterized as a disruption of the fronto-striatal dopamine network. Cognitive deficits in other domains (recognition memory, attention processes and visuospatial abilities) become apparent with the progression of PD and development of dementia. In dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) the cognitive impairment develops early or even precedes parkinsonism and it is more pronounced in visu...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The brain is an energy-hungry organ, and is sensitive to reductions in the blood supply of oxygen and nutrients. Cardiovascular aging can reduce that supply, whether through conditions such as heart failure, or the progressive loss of density in capillary networks that occurs throughout the body with advancing age, or an accelerated pace of rupture of tiny vessels in the brain, or disruption of the blood-brain barrier, allowing unwanted molecules and cells to enter the brain. Thus, as researchers here note, we would expect to see correlations between cardiovascular disease, or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and d...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 November 2019Source: NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Hala El Khoury, John Mitrofanis, Luke A HendersonAbstractWe explore whether near infrared light can change patterns of resting (task-negative) and/or evoked (task-positive; eg finger-tapping) brain activity in normal, young human subjects using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). To this end, we used a vielight transcranial device (810nm) and compared the scans in subjects after active- and sham-light sessions. Our fMRI results showed that, while light had no effect on cerebral blood flow and global resting state brain activity (task...
Source: Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
ConclusionWM integrity was found to be significantly altered in RPD but not in LPD, suggesting that LPD profile may be associated to more favorable prognosis. Since clinical laterality onset may affect the extent of WM integrity changes, it should be taken into account in neuroimaging studies investigating PD.
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Anti-CV2 autoimmune encephalitis can present as Parkinsonism with bilateral leukoencephalopathy on MRI. PET scanning can be useful to reveal an occult cancer. Treatment of the cancer may improve the paraneoplastic neurological syndrome without the need of immunosuppressive therapy.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Objective: To investigate the dynamic amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (dALFFs) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls (HCs) and further explore whether dALFF can be used to test the feasibility of differentiating PD from HCs.Methods: Twenty-eight patients with PD and 28 demographically matched HCs underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scans and neuropsychological tests. A dynamic method was used to calculate the dALFFs of rs-fMRI data obtained from all subjects. The dALFF alterations were compared between the PD and HC groups, and the correlations between dA...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
French researchers are developing what they say is the most powerful Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner in the world which will use a supermagnet the weight of a blue whale and should allow earlier diagnosis of diseases such as Parkinson's.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
ConclusionU-net segmentation provided relatively high accuracy in the evaluation of the SNpc in NM-MRI and yielded diagnostic performance comparable to that of the established manual method.
Source: Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The T1-weighted pallidal signal is associated with occupational Mn exposure and severity of parkinsonism.
Source: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine - Category: Occupational Health Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
More News: Brain | France Health | Health | MRI Scan | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Parkinson's Disease | PET Scan