What is wound dehiscence?

When all goes well after an operation, the surgical wound heals, as the edges slowly but surely meet each other and are held together by sutures or staples. A possible complication in this process is dehiscence, also known as wound separation. It occurs when the edges of the wound fail to meet, causing the incision closure to give way. Mild dehiscence only affects a single staple or suture, while severe cases can cause the entire incision to pull away and re-open the wound. Here's what patients should know about wound dehiscence treatment and prevention: Wound dehiscence is a possible post-surgery complication. Wound dehiscence causes There are several possible causes of wound dehiscence, including patient malnourishment and surgical site infection. According to Verywell Health, stress on the wound caused by movements like coughing, sneezing or vomiting can also cause the incision to open. Obese patients may also be more susceptible to dehiscence because the incision closures must be stronger to account for additional tissue weight. Wound dehiscence treatment If you notice any signs of dehiscence, contact your surgeon as soon as possible. Most cases will call for antibiotics to prevent infection from reaching the newly opened wound. Your surgeon will create a new surgical closing, and the wound will be monitored carefully thereafter. Ultimately, however, the best wound dehiscence treatment is prevention, as noted by the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Wound d...
Source: Advanced Tissue - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Wound Care Wound Infection Source Type: news

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Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
We all want our gut to feel good. No one wants a gut that is in constant turmoil possibly leading to serious conditions of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, diabetes, obesity or rheumatoid arthritis. What our gut is trying to tell us when these diseases arise is that the gut’s microbiome, partly inherited from your mother at birth and partly determined by your lifestyle, have a great deal of influence on our health. Our gut microbiome is made of up bacteria, all good, that live within our intestines helping us digest our food. Digestion is serious business as these microbes munch away making essential vitami...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By Brandon R. Peters, MD When sleep is not refreshing, the feelings of tiredness and fatigue can undermine your daytime function. Beyond common sleep disorders like obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia, what are some of the reasons for feeling tired? Explore some of these potential causes, ranging from medications to diet and exercise, and try to discover what you can do to feel better. Understanding the Role of Sleep Disorders First, it is important to recognize that there is a difference between sleepiness and fatigue. Sleepiness is the strong desire for sleep that often immediately precedes falling asleep. It is some...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle arthritis autoimmune diabetes eating disorder gluten grains Inflammation joint Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
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Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Healthy Eating Parenting Safety Source Type: news
Sydne took the information in Wheat Belly Total Health to heart and is enjoying a dramatic turnaround in health. “My family and friends know me well enough to know that I NEVER share photos of myself. As a matter of fact as my thyroid dysfunction worsened over the years, I tried very hard to stay out of all photos. The issues with my thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroidism) went on for more than 15 years and became worse as time went on. I went from doctor to doctor seeking answers, to no avail. I cannot tell you how much I suffered during this time, mostly in silence except when I was alone. Those are the times I would...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: babies brain development Cord Blood medical research parents pregnancy stem cells Uncategorized affordable cord blood banking cerebral palsy cord blood banking fees cord blood treatment for Leukemia cord clamping due dates heal Source Type: blogs
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