Pitt team finds mechanism that causes noise-induced tinnitus and drug that can prevent it

(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) An epilepsy drug shows promise in an animal model at preventing tinnitus from developing after exposure to loud noise, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, reported this week in the early online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveal for the first time the reason the chronic and sometimes debilitating condition occurs.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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​BY ARJUN BHARADWAJ; CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL; MARGARET GAVOR, MBCHB, MPH; &KHALID MALIK, MDA 63-year-old man presented with hand tremors, dizziness, and expressive aphasia. His symptoms had started a month earlier, and this was his third visit to the ED for these symptoms, though the aphasia was a new symptom. He said his symptoms had been growing worse.The patient's symptoms had been previously attributed to alcohol intoxication. He also said he had been experiencing vomiting, dry heaving, bilateral tinnitus, and dizziness but no fever, chills, chest pain, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, vision and hearing problems...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent enthusiasm for cannabinoid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain and some forms of epilepsy, raises the question of whether they could be useful for other disorders associated with abnormal neuronal activity in the brain, such as subjective tinnitus. Indeed, there is evidence to indicate that some tinnitus sufferers self-medicate using Cannabis. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the available evidence relating to the effects of cannabinoids on tinnitus. RECENT FINDINGS: Despite the fact that cannabinoids have been shown to decrease neuronal hyperactivity in ...
Source: Epilepsy Curr - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Neurol Source Type: research
AbstractNeurofeedback is a well-investigated treatment for ADHD and epilepsy, especially when restricted to standard protocols such as theta/beta, slow cortical potentials and sensori-motor rhythm neurofeedback. Advances in any field are welcome and other techniques are being pursued. Manufacturers and clinicians are marketing ‘superior’ neurofeedback approaches including 19 channel Z-score neurofeedback (ZNFB) and 3-D LORETA neurofeedback (with or without Z-scores; LNFB). We conducted a review of the empirical literature to determine if such claims were warranted. This review included the above searc...
Source: Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 July 2018Source: American Journal of OtolaryngologyAuthor(s): Helena Wichova, Sameer A. Alvi, James Lin, Keith Sale, Christopher Larsen, Hinrich StaeckerAbstractPurposeVagal nerve stimulation in conjunction with sound therapy has been proposed as a treatment for subjective tinnitus. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the effect of VNS on perception of tinnitus in epilepsy patients. We explore the incidence of tinnitus and its perceived reduction in patients requiring implantation of VNS for medically refractory seizures.Materials and methodsA phone survey was conduc...
Source: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Functional MRI (fMRI) has shown that when you get an uplifting feeling from...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI offers clues about memory loss in older adults fMRI, machine learning could predict OCD therapy outcomes fMRI shows what makes an angry drunk fMRI, PET could help foresee epileptic seizure issues fMRI helps guide therapy designed to reduce tinnitus
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Progress in drug development has brought a host of novel agents for the treatment of neurological disorders ranging from multiple sclerosis to chronic pain. However, the treatment of most neurological disorders is still dependent on older medications. This includes medications, such as carbamazepine, with clinical activity across a broad number of disorders. Carbamazepine was first approved in 1963 for the treatment of epilepsy but has been used for treating types of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, neuropathic pain, tinnitus, and trigeminal neuralgia. Although this agent is safe and effective for many patients, there is a...
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Functional MRI (fMRI) offers clues as to which memory lapses in older adults...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI, machine learning could predict OCD therapy outcomes fMRI shows what makes an angry drunk fMRI, PET could help foresee epileptic seizure issues fMRI helps guide therapy designed to reduce tinnitus MRI shows brain changes after 1 season of youth football
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
By analyzing resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) brain scans with a machine-learning...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI shows what makes an angry drunk fMRI, PET could help foresee epileptic seizure issues fMRI helps guide therapy designed to reduce tinnitus
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Functional MRI (fMRI) of blood flow in the brain is offering insight into why...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI, PET could help foresee epileptic seizure issues fMRI helps guide therapy designed to reduce tinnitus
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
(Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering) The Wyss Center, a non-profit neurotechnology translation organization, has signed a partnership agreement with German medical engineering company, CorTec. The partners will work together on research, design and development of a device for continuous, long-term, monitoring of the brain's electrophysiological signals for clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The planned device will sit on the skull, beneath the skin and has potential uses in epilepsy monitoring, tinnitus regulation through neurofeedback, neuromodulation for dyslexia and other brain circuit disorders.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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