In 1918, a parade sparked a killer flu outbreak in Philadelphia. This Saturday, another parade pays homage to those victims.

The event kicks off “Spit Spreads Death,” an exhibition about this city’s health disaster and the worldwide influenza pandemic nearly a hundred years ago.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

Related Links:

A recent study in this journal compared codon usage among NA subtypes (N1, N2, N6, and N8)  of H5Nx highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses (HPAIVs) and suggested that codon usage in N1 subtype is better adapted to its host than the epidemic NA subtypes (N6 and N8), which had fewer number of human cases compared to the N1 subtype.1 To date, there are 18 known HA subtypes (H1-H18) and 11 known NA subtypes (N1-N11)2. However, only N1 and N2 subtypes have been reported to cause pandemics (H1N1 for the 1918 and 2009 pandemics; H2N2 for the 1957 pandemic; and H3N2 for the 1968 pandemic) or seasonal outbreaks in humans3.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Craig A. Molgaard explores the origins, spread and impact of the deadly influenza pandemic of 1918 –1919, and how the outbreak intersected with the end of the First World War
Source: Significance - Category: Statistics Authors: Tags: In Detail Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 July 2019Source: Spatial and Spatio-temporal EpidemiologyAuthor(s): Rachel L. Woodul, Paul L. Delamater, Michael EmchAbstractThis research investigates the geographic aspects of health care delivery in the event of a sudden increase in the need for care. We constructed an integrated disease outbreak and surge capacity model to evaluate the ability of a region's healthcare system to provide care in the event of a pandemic. In a case study, we implement the model to investigate how an influenza pandemic similar to the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic would affect the population of the Raleigh-Du...
Source: Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Authors: Mammas IN, Theodoridou M, Thiagarajan P, Melidou A, Papaioannou G, Korovessi P, Koutsaftiki C, Papatheodoropoulou A, Calachanis M, Dalianis T, Spandidos DA Abstract This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 1918 Spanish flu outbreak on the Greek Aegean Sea island of Skyros, which devastated its population in less than 30 days. According to Constantinos Faltaits's annals published in 1919, the influenza attack on the island of Skyros commenced acutely 'like a thunderbolt' on the 27th of October, 1918 and was exceptionally severe and fatal. At that time, the viral cause of the influenza had not been detec...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
In “The Pandemic Century” Mark Honigsbaum covers nine outbreaks that shaped how we think and respond to diseases.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Books and Literature The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria, and Hubris (Book) Mark Honigsbaum Epidemics Influenza SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Ebola Virus Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Source Type: news
(Taylor&Francis Group) The most severe pandemic in recent history, killing some 50 million people worldwide, the Spanish influenza, may have emerged up to two years earlier than previously believed. And, according to a new and influential study, its early manifestation was ignored at the time as a 'minor infection.'
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Mark K. Slifka1* and Ian J. Amanna2 1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, Beaverton, OR, United States2Najít Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, OR, United States Vaccines play a vital role in protecting our communities against infectious disease. Unfortunately, some vaccines provide only partial protection or in some cases vaccine-mediated immunity may wane rapidly, resulting in either increased susceptibility to that disease or a requirement for more booster vaccinations in order to maintain immunity above a protective level. The durability of a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Jennifer M. Rudd1, Sivasami Pulavendran1, Harshini K. Ashar1, Jerry W. Ritchey1, Timothy A. Snider1, Jerry R. Malayer1, Montelongo Marie1, Vincent T. K. Chow2 and Teluguakula Narasaraju1* 1Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, United States2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore Exaggerated host innate immune responses have been implicated in severe influenza pneumonia. We have previously demonstrated that excessive neutrophils recruited during in...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Although influenza science has come a long way since the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, influenza continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This review provides current, evidence-based recommendations regarding influenza prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Nurse practitioners can help reduce influenza-associated morbidity and mortality by receiving annual influenza vaccinations, encouraging patients and community members to receive annual influenza vaccinations, developing and implementing strategies to improve influenza vaccination rates, encouraging preventive personal and community nonpharmaceutical inte...
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Featured Article Source Type: research
The flu season is up and running in the Northern Hemisphere, and early signs in both the United States and Europe are that the effects might not be quite as severe as the brutal 2017/18 season. The United States is predominantly seeing H1N1 circulating, while monitoring in Europe has identified co-circulation of H1N1 and H3N2—both varieties of Influenza A that should be covered by the seasonable vaccine. What if they weren’t though? Influenza A can be found in both human and animal populations, and it evolves rapidly through genetic mutation. Each year many humans rely on their country&a...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: IVD Source Type: news
More News: 1918 Spanish Flu | Flu Pandemic | Health | Influenza | Outbreaks | Pandemics