Obstructive Sleep Apnea May Increase Depression, Anxiety Risk

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of developing depression and anxiety in adults, astudy inJAMA Otolaryngology-Head&Neck Surgery has found. OSA is a condition in which the muscles of the throat relax during sleep and block the airway, which causes breathing to stop and start repeatedly throughout the night. Jong-Yeup Kim, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at Konyang University in Korea analyzed the health records of 985 adults from the Korea National Health Insurance Service –National Sample Cohort in South Korea database. Between January 2004 and December 2006, 197 patients were diagnosed with OSA. The researchers matched these patients with 788 patients of similar age, sex, income, and more who were not diagnosed with OSA to compare diagnoses of affective disorders between the two groups over the follow-up period.Over nine years of follow-up, patients who were diagnosed with OSA were nearly three times as likely to develop a depressive disorder and nearly twice as likely to develop an anxiety disorder than those who were not diagnosed with OSA. Women with OSA were more likely to develop these conditions than men.Kim and colleagues cited prior research of possible reasons why risk of depression and anxiety may be higher in people with OSA, including reduced oxygen saturation (how much oxygen is attached to red blood cells) and increased daytime sleepiness.“Further studies appear to be needed to validate [our] findings and explo...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety daytime sleepiness depression JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery Jong-Yeup Kim obstructive sleep apnea OSA Source Type: research

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People with obstructive sleep apnea were more likely to be diagnosed with depression or anxiety than those without the condition.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Stress Apnea (Sleep Disorder) Mental Health and Disorders Depression (Mental) Source Type: news
This cohort study uses a Korean nationwide database to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea is associated with the development of depression and anxiety.
Source: JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: In the preliminary results of our pilot study, we assessed that symptoms of anxiety mainly contribute to macrophages accumulation, whereas increased number of respiratory events reduces the extent of vascularization in visceral fat in OSA. Based on this observation, further larger studies are required to verify if anxious OSA patients are more vulnerable to the metabolic manifestations of the syndrome.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundPoor adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) remains the greatest obstacle to effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The purpose of the present study was to identify if mindfulness is associated with CPAP adherence of OSAHS patients.MethodsNewly diagnosed patients with OSAHS completed questionnaires including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and had experienced an overnight CPAP titration. Participants returned to the sleep center for a scheduled research...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) remains the greatest obstacle to effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The purpose of the present study was to identify if mindfulness is associated with CPAP adherence of OSAHS patients. METHODS: Newly diagnosed patients with OSAHS completed questionnaires including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and had experienced an overnight CPAP titration. Participants returned to the sleep center for ...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
Sleep Is Compromised in −12° Head Down Tilt Position Alessa L. Boschert1*, David Elmenhorst2,3, Peter Gauger1, Zhili Li4, Maria T. Garcia-Gutierrez5, Darius Gerlach1, Bernd Johannes1, Jochen Zange1, Andreas Bauer2,6 and Jörn Rittweger1,7 1Department of Muscle and Bone Metabolism, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne, Germany 2Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-2), Jülich, Germany 3Division of Medical Psychology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany 4State Key Laboratory of Space Medicine Fundamentals and Application, China ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
ConclusionCompared to HCs, individuals with NMOSD reported poorer quality of life and higher levels of depression and anxiety. Further, among individuals with NMOSD, sleep characteristics are predicted by a complex variety of illness-related factors.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study aims to validate an ambulatory circadian monitoring (ACM) device for the detection of sleep and wake states and apply it to the evaluation of sleep quality in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A polysomnographic validation study was conducted on a group of patients with different sleep disorders in a preliminary phase, followed by a pilot study to apply this methodology to PD patients. The ACM device makes it possible to estimate the main sleep parameters very accurately, as demonstrated by: (a) the lack of significant differences between the mean values detected by PSG and ACM in time in bed (TIB), total sl...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The use of continuous PAP improves not only the quality of life for OSAS patients but also for their spouses and reduces the spouses' depression risk.
Source: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice - Category: Rural Health Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionThe results of our study suggest that patients with REM-related OSAS have higher rates of depression and anxiety compared to non-REM-related OSAS patients and this may adversely affect quality of life. It may be possible to prevent psychiatric complications, such as depression and anxiety, by administering treatments that reduce REM sleep duration and intensity in patients with REM-related OSAS.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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