Thermal field formation during wIRA-hyperthermia: temperature measurements in skin and subcutis of piglets as a basis for thermotherapy of superficial tumors and local skin infections caused by thermosensitive microbial pathogens.

Thermal field formation during wIRA-hyperthermia: temperature measurements in skin and subcutis of piglets as a basis for thermotherapy of superficial tumors and local skin infections caused by thermosensitive microbial pathogens. Int J Hyperthermia. 2019;36(1):938-952 Authors: Piazena H, Müller W, Pendl W, von Ah S, Cap VH, Hug PJ, Sidler X, Pluschke G, Vaupel P Abstract Purpose: The temporal and spatial formation of the temperature field and its changes during/upon water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA)-irradiation in porcine skin and subcutis were investigated in vivo in order to get a detailed physical basis for thermotherapy of superficial tumors and infections caused by thermosensitive microbial pathogens (e.g., Mycobacterium ulcerans causing Buruli ulcer). Methods: Local wIRA-hyperthermia was performed in 11 anesthetized piglets using 85.0 mW cm-2, 103.2 mW cm-2 and 126.5 mW cm-2, respectively. Invasive temperature measurements were carried out simultaneously in 1-min intervals using eight fiber-optical probes at different tissue depths between 2 and 20 mm, and by an IR thermometer at the skin surface. Results: Tissue temperature distribution depended on incident irradiance, exposure time, tissue depths and individual 'physiologies' of the animals. Temperature maxima were found at depths between 4 and 7 mm, exceeding skin surface temperatures by about 1-2 K. Tissue temperatures above 37 °C, necess...
Source: International Journal of Hyperthermia - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Int J Hyperthermia Source Type: research

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Three cases of disease have emerged south of its usual catchment area in far-north QueenslandThe spread of a severe tissue-destroying ulcer once rare in Australia to a new geographic area in Queensland has infectious disease experts worried.The Buruli ulcer, also known as the Bairnsdale ulcer or Daintree ulcer, is an infection that eventually leads to an eruption of painful skin ulcers that fail to heal. There have been no reported cases in New South Wales, South Australia or Tasmania, with the disease so far confined to the Douglas Shire in far north Queensland between Mossman and just beyond the Daintree River, and to Vi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Australia news Queensland Health Source Type: news
Abstract Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. Unclear transmission, no available vaccine, and suboptimal treatment regimens hamper the control of this disease. Carefully designed preclinical research is needed to address these shortcomings. In vivo imaging (IVIS®) of infection is an emerging tool that permits monitoring of disease progression and reduces the need to using large numbers of mice at different time-points during the experiment, as individual mice can be imaged at multiple time-points. We aimed to further describe the use of in vivo imag...
Source: Am J Trop Med Hyg - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
We report here a case of Buruli ulcer in a patient who travelled in Senegal, a country not identified by the World Health Organization to be an endemic country for this disease. Our case is the third Buruli ulcer case reported as contracted in Senegal, showing that it is urgent to develop data collection in this country by having an active community-based surveillance-response system.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Medical Imagery Source Type: research
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Microbiological Methods - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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