Subcapsular Splenic Hemorrhage in Vivax Malaria.

We report 3 cases of subcapsular hemorrhage of the spleen in vivax malaria, with varying degrees of severity. Case 1 showed subcapsular hemorrhage without splenic rupture, was treated by antimalarial drug without any procedure. The healing process of the patient's spleen was monitored through 6 computed tomography follow-up examinations, over 118 days. Case 2 presented subcapsular hemorrhage with splenic rupture, treated only with an antimalarial drug. Case 3 showed subcapsular hemorrhage with splenic rupture and hypotension, treated using splenic artery embolization. They all recovered from subcapsular hemorrhage without any other complications. These 3 cases reveal the process of subcapsular hemorrhage leading to rupture and a potentially fatal outcome. The treatment plan of subcapsular hemorrhage should be determined carefully considering the vital signs, changes in hemoglobin, and bleeding tendency. PMID: 31533407 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Korean Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Tags: Korean J Parasitol Source Type: research

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ConclusionSeveral contextual factors encourage home births among women in the Krachi Nchumuru District, Ghana. There is, therefore, the need to increase health facilities and personnel to provide skilled delivery care and improve the transportation infrastructure in the district.
Source: Global Social Welfare - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
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Source: Infectious Disorders Drug Targets - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Infect Disord Drug Targets Source Type: research
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Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: HEMOSTASIS AND THROMBOSIS: Edited by Alvin H. Schmaier Source Type: research
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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Africa AI artificial intelligence Congo digital digital health digital maps disease disease outbreak ebola epidemic Innovation technology Source Type: blogs
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Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED RogueRad Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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