Thyme oil alginate-based edible coatings inhibit growth of pathogenic microorganisms spoiling fresh-cut cantaloupe

Publication date: Available online 18 September 2019Source: Food BioscienceAuthor(s): Sarengaowa, Wenzhong Hu, Ke Feng, Zhilong Xiu, Aili Jiang, Ying LaoAbstractFresh-cut cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) is a popular food. However, the presence of foodborne pathogen on the cut surfaces leads to both spoilage and food poisoning of fresh-cut cantaloupe. The antibacterial effectiveness of an alginate-based edible coating (EC) containing thyme oil was evaluated against foodborne pathogens on fresh-cut cantaloupe samples. Cantaloupe samples were treated with alginate-based EC and alginate-based EC containing different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.35, and 0.65%, v/v) of thyme oil. Uncoated samples served as the control. The viability of naturally occurring microorganisms and artificially inoculated foodborne pathogens on the fresh-cut cantaloupe samples, as well as cantaloupe respiration rate, weight loss, and colour, were determined every 4 days over 16 days at 4 °C. Results showed that alginate-based EC containing thyme oil effectively improved the quality of fresh-cut cantaloupe and prolonged its shelf life. The treatments inhibited the growth of naturally occurring microorganisms and artificially inoculated pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7) on fresh-cut cantaloupe samples. Treatment with alginate-based EC containing 0.05% thyme oil did not affect the respiration, prevented weight loss, and maintained ...
Source: Food Bioscience - Category: Food Science Source Type: research

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Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
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Source: The American Journal of Chinese Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Chin Med Source Type: research
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Source: Meat Science - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
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Source: LWT Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
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Source: Food Chemistry - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Food Safety - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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Source: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Safety food safety foodborne illness Source Type: news
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