A Case of Anaphylaxis to Measles Vaccination in an Infant with Cow's Milk Allergy

Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology,Volume 32, Issue 3, Page 135-138, September 2019.
Source: Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Sande O. Okelo, Andrew L. Bilderback, Maria Fagnano, Jill S. Halterman
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2019Source: Molecular Immunology, Volume 116Author(s): Mokhtar Nosrati, Abbas Hajizade, Shahram Nazarian, Jafar Amani, Amir Namvar Vansofla, Yousof TarverdizadehAbstractShigellosis is a severe diarrheal disease with high mortality and morbidity rate. Until now, there is no approved vaccine against the disease. Therefore, the present study was planned to design a novel multi-epitope vaccine against Shigella spp., the causative agents of the disease based on the immunoinformatic tools. For this end, firstly seven conserved antigens of the bacteria, including IpaA, IpaB, IpaC, IpaD, OmpC, OmpF and V...
Source: Molecular Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: LWT, Volume 118Author(s): Salma Ben-Harb, Françoise Irlinger, Anne Saint-Eve, Maud Panouillé, Isabelle Souchon, Pascal BonnarmeAbstractThe use of pea protein is limited in food by the persistence of off-flavours. Fermentation by microbial consortia could be a way to circumvent this problem. The aim of our study was to investigate the adaptation potential and metabolic features of consortia as a function of the matrix composition (pea and/or milk proteins). Three designed consortia were investigated for their ability (i) to grow in gels containing 100% pea proteins, 50% pe...
Source: LWT Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 October 2019Source: Food Research InternationalAuthor(s): Silvani Verruck, Clarissa Barreta, Marília Miotto, Maria Helena Machado Canella, Gabriela Rodrigues de Liz, Bruna Marchesan Maran, Sofia Grechi Garcia, Sheila Mello da Silveira, Cleide Rosana Werneck Vieira, Adriano Gomes da Cruz, Elane Schwinden PrudencioAbstractGoat milk and goat milk and inulin were used as encapsulating agents of Bifidobacterium BB-12 and applied in Frozen Yogurt (GF2 and GF3, respectively) in order to evaluate the antagonistic effect against Escherichia coli. GF1 is a control containing only Escheric...
Source: Food Research International - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
In this study, we carried out qualitative and quantitative analysis of the donkey whey proteome using a label-free proteomic approach, combined with parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) as a validation method. A total of 300 whey proteins were identified in donkey colostrum (DC) and donkey mature (DM) milk, of which 18 were differentially expressed (P
Source: Food Research International - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 October 2019Source: Food Research InternationalAuthor(s): Vilmara Albuquerque de Farias, Amanda Dias da Rocha Lima, Andréa Santos Costa, Cléverson Diniz T. de Freitas, Idila Maria da Silva Araújo, Deborah dos Santos Garruti, Evânia Altina Teixeira de Figueiredo, Hermógenes David de OliveiraAbstractThis work reports the characterisation of caseinolytic and milk-clotting activities of proteases extracted from ripe fruits of Morinda citrifolia L., as a potential of their use in cheese production. Noni puree extract (NPE) was obtained by homogenising the fr...
Source: Food Research International - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: Food Research International, Volume 127Author(s): Ling Xiong, Chengkang Li, Sjef Boeren, Jacques Vervoort, Kasper HettingaAbstractBovine milk shows bacteriostatic activity mainly due to the presence of antibacterial proteins, like lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase and immunoglobulins. Heat treatment is applied to kill bacteria and thereby extend shelf life of dairy products. Such heat treatment may, however, impair the activity of native antibacterial proteins in milk. The aim of this study was to investigate bacteriostatic capacity and retention of antibacterial proteins in unheated and he...
Source: Food Research International - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
AbstractObjectivesTo determine the allergic reactions that develop after Measles and Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccination, and whether any delay in the timing of vaccination occurs in children with food allergy.MethodsChildren with food allergy who were admitted to the Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital Healthy Child Clinic between 1st January 2015 and 30th June 2018 for Measles or MMR vaccination were studied retrospectively. Their age, delayed days of vaccination, the types of allergic food, the results of the specific IgE and skin tests, and any reaction after the vaccination were recorded.ResultsD...
Source: Indian Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Abstract The study aimed to describe cases and verify the frequency of anaphylaxis related to measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine produced by manufacturer A and to assess associated risk factors. This was a case-control study (1:4) in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, from July 14, 2014, to January 12, 2015, in children from one year to less than five years of age, vaccinated with MMR and reported with anaphylaxis, while the controls were without anaphylaxis. The measure of association was odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95%CI), using the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Anaphylaxis rates were ...
Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
Shocked by the growing number of children who die from vaccine-preventable diseases in Italy -- as well as stories of parents who refuse to vaccinate their kids -- a professor of microbiology and virology has decided to take on anti-vaxxers where they spread misinformation: on Facebook. For the more than 20,000 followers of his Facebook page, Dr. Roberto Burioni, a professor at the Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Milan, Italy, explains the science behind vaccines and uses scientific data to refute rumors about their dangers. When he is not citing scientific studies, he pegs hi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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