Prognostic significance of chronic respiratory symptoms in individuals with normal spirometry

Normal spirometry is often used to preclude airway disease in individuals with unspecific respiratory symptoms. We tested the hypothesis that chronic respiratory symptoms are associated with respiratory hospitalisations and death in individuals with normal spirometry without known airway disease. We included 108 246 randomly chosen individuals aged 20–100 years from a Danish population-based cohort study. Normal spirometry was defined as a pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio ≥0.70. Chronic respiratory symptoms included dyspnoea, chronic mucus hypersecretion, wheezing and cough. Individuals with known airway disease, i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or asthma, were excluded (n=10 291). We assessed risk of hospitalisations due to exacerbations of airway disease and pneumonia, and respiratory and all-cause mortality, from 2003 through 2018. 52 999 individuals had normal spirometry without chronic respiratory symptoms and 30 890 individuals had normal spirometry with chronic respiratory symptoms. During follow-up, we observed 1037 hospitalisations with exacerbation of airway disease, 5743 hospitalisations with pneumonia and 8750 deaths, of which 463 were due to respiratory disease. Compared with individuals with normal spirometry without chronic respiratory symptoms, multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for individuals with normal spirometry with chronic respiratory symptoms were 1.62 (95% CI 1.20–2...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Lung structure and function, Respiratory clinical practice Original Articles: Lung structure and function Source Type: research

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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers AI asthma cancer cancer treatment care COPD diagnostics inhaler lung lung cancer management medical specialty pulmonology respiratory respiratory care Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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