My Ironic Journey as an SLP With ‘ Chemo Brain ’

I defeated breast cancer, but am still battling the cognitive changes left behind after two years of intense treatment. Eight surgeries, six chemotherapy treatments, 25 radiation appointments, and two bouts of infection changed my body forever. I’m OK with that, because everything was done to keep me alive. All signs point to these efforts succeeding. But one remnant of the battle didn’t get left behind with the wigs and empty medicine bottles: chemo brain. “Chemo brain” is a common term used for the attention and memory issues often caused by cancer treatment—although these issues are thought to come from multiple sources, not just chemotherapy. I never imagined this ironic side effect of the cancer battle. I’ve worked as a speech-language pathologist in acute care and rehab for 30 years, and now I faced the same cognitive challenges I’d helped many of my patients overcome. I love my job, my patients, and my work family. Was I going to be able to continue to work full time? Or at all? Creating an Easier Path for Patients With Head/Neck Cancer Hearing Loss: An Under-Recognized Side Effect of Cancer Treatment Gayla Poling seeks ways to prevent and treat hearing loss in patients receiving cisplatin treatment for cancer. I first noticed my chemo brain when I lead meetings in my small department of four SLPs. We’ve been a team for years and communicate well. But in meetings, I experienced difficulty keeping a thought. I’d ge...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Cognitive Rehabilitation Source Type: blogs

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Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Endocrine therapy is the most important systemic treatment for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, resulting in substantial risk reduction and improvements in survival. Yet, the strategies to reduce or block estrogen including ovarian suppression or ablation, aromatase inhibition or tamoxifen can all lead to symptoms and long-term toxicities associated with estrogen deprivation. The effect of long-term estrogen deprivation on bone, heart and brain health may lead to substantial morbidity and should be considered when making treatment decisions and managed in follow-up. However, even less serious daily sympt...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Invited Speaker Abstracts Source Type: research
November is National Family Caregivers Month and to mark the occasion, HuffPost50 published a callout in September from our editor-at-large Rita Wilson seeking stories of inspiring caregivers. We were inundated with submissions, some from family members and some from the caregivers themselves. In this second installment of a two-part series titled Unsung Heroes: The Faces Of Caregiving In America Today, you’ll read about five of the many people across the country who put their own lives on pause to tend to friends and family members who have fallen ill. Another five caregivers were profiled last week. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
It's been two weeks since my surgery and for some reason, I thought this would be the easy part. I don't really know why I thought that, except that both my surgeon a and my medical oncologist seemed to the think that putting the Ommaya in could have been like day surgery and I would be feeling like myself again in a week or so.Not so much.The nurses were much more cautious and they said to take it easy, be consistent in my activity and increase it very slowly. Ultimately, this is what makes sense. I just wish I weren't so damned impatient.My surgery was on May 9th. I was in the recovery room for much longer than planned b...
Source: Not just about cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: brain metastasis breast cancer cancer blog chronic illness CT scan fear herceptin metastatic pissed off rants surgery Source Type: blogs
I was diagnosed with breast cancer in June 2015. I share my learning that jolted me back on track to a new life. This is my fifth posting. The sun was shining non-stop during July and August in Stockholm. Facebook was filled with pictures of the perfect holiday. As the initial feeling of shock was calming down, I started to long for carefree days. Carefree days. What a wonderful taste these two words have. Carefreeness is a state of mind, but I longed to be carefree on the savanna in Kenya. I have travelled to many wonderful places in the world, but nothing beats waking up in the Masai Mara as the sun rises, putting on ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Armodafinil 150 mg/day was well tolerated in primary brain tumor patients undergoing RT with good compliance. While there was no overall significant effect on fatigue, those with greater baseline fatigue experienced improved QOL and reduced fatigue when using armodafinil. These data suggest that a prospective, phase III randomized trial is warranted for patients with greater baseline fatigue.
Source: Neuro-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigations Source Type: research
It's no secret that here at The Huffington Post, we love sleep -- and for good reason. Sleep has been called the "third pillar" of health, along with nutrition and exercise. Getting the quality sleep that you need has the power to protect your physical and mental health, while skipping out on sleep can seriously hurt your health, cognition and well-being over time. Over the past 10 years, sleep has finally become widely recognized as a critical aspect of good health, and new research has shed more light on its importance in our lives. Here's what we've learned. 1. A sleeping brain is an active brain. While...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
00:00 to 02.26—Dr. Bihari gives his background and credentials. Dr. Bihari: My medical training started at Harvard Medical School. I graduated in 1957. Then I trained in Internal Medicine at one of the Harvard teaching hospitals in Boston, Beth Israel, and then in Neurology at Massachusetts General in Boston. Then I went to the National Institutes of Health for two years doing brain physiology—brain research. I did another residency training in Psychiatry in New York, at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and then, over the following five or six years, I got very involved in working in Drug Addiction. By 197...
Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anecdotal Treatments HONEST MEDICINE Integrative Medicine Low Dose Naltrexone Obituaries Source Type: blogs
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