Histology of skeletal muscle reconstructed by means of the implantation of autologous adipose tissue: an experimental study.

Histology of skeletal muscle reconstructed by means of the implantation of autologous adipose tissue: an experimental study. Histol Histopathol. 2019 Sep 12;:18163 Authors: Leiva-Cepas F, Jimena I, Ruz-Caracuel I, Luque E, Villalba R, Peña-Amaro J Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the histological characteristics of a skeletal muscle reconstructed by means of the implantation of autologous adipose tissue following an experimentally-induced volumetric muscle loss. A cylindrical piece in the belly of the rat anterior tibial muscle was removed. In the hole, inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue of the same rat was grafted. Animals were sacrificed 7, 14, 21, 28 and 60 days posttransplantation. Histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical and morphometric techniques were used. At all times analyzed, the regenerative muscle fibers formed from the edges of the muscle tissue showed histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical differences in comparison with the control group. These differences are related to delays in the maturation process and are related to problems in reinnervation and disorientation of muscle fibers. The stains for MyoD and desmin showed that some myoblasts and myotubes seem to derive from the transplanted adipose tissue. After 60 days, the transplant area was 20% occupied by fibrosis and by 80% skeletal muscle. However, the neo-muscle was chaotically organized showing muscle fiber disorientation and centronu...
Source: Histology and Histopathology - Category: Cytology Tags: Histol Histopathol Source Type: research

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