Bariatric Surgery is Associated with Reduction in Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Propensity Matched Analysis

Publication date: Available online 16 September 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Minyoung Kwak, J. Hunter Mehaffey, Robert B. Hawkins, Angel Hsu, Bruce Schirmer, Peter T. HallowellAbstractIntroductionObesity is a risk factor for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Bariatric surgery can provide durable weight-loss, but little is known about the later development of NASH and HCC after surgery.MethodsBariatric surgery (n=3,410) and obese controls (n=46,873) from an institutional data repository were propensity score matched 1:1 by demographics, comorbidities, BMI, and socioeconomic factors. Comparisons were made through paired univariate analysis and conditional logistic regression.ResultsTotal of 4,112 patients were well matched with no significant baseline differences except initial BMI (49.0 vs 48.2, p=0.04). Bariatric group demonstrated fewer new-onset NASH (6 .0% vs 10.3%, p
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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This study aims to determine the effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin therapy on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the patients with morbid obesity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical, anthropometric and laboratory data were analyzed together with intraoperative liver biopsies from morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. RESULTS: 219 patients with morbid obesity were evaluated. Systemic arterial hypertension (55.9% vs. 33.8%, p = 0.004) and dyslipidemia (67.1% vs. 39.0%, p
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
Conclusions: While there is a certain overlap between the results of the current study and published transcriptomic profiles of non-transplanted livers with steatosis, we have identified discrete characteristics of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver grafts potentially utilizable for the establishment of predictive signature. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in industrialized countries, its prevalence being estimated at 19–31.3% (1). It encompasses a range of conditions that are thought to arise from fatty liver (simple steatosis) throu...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Authors: Martín Mateos R, Allen AM Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly recognized as the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, with a global prevalence of 25.2%. The high burden of NAFLD extends beyond liver diseases, as patients are at risk of developing not only liver related conditions, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, but also cardiovascular complications associated to metabolic syndrome. The present special issue of The Spanish Journal of Gastroenterology (Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas) focusses on diverse key aspects o...
Source: Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Rev Esp Enferm Dig Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There is a close relationship between splicing machinery dysregulation and NAFLD development, which should be further investigated to identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID: 30901032 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
ConclusionLSG after LT is technically feasible. Larger series are needed to improve the safety of the procedure in this high-risk population.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsNAFLD could be dealt with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, preventing its progression into cirrhosis. SG can be performed in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome, with NAFLD showing satisfactory results 12  months after surgery. NAFLD should be a formal indication for bariatric surgery.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Authors: Wong VW Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common chronic liver disease worldwide and the second leading indication for liver transplantation and the third leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States. This chapter focuses on the prevention and management of NAFLD. Healthy lifestyle is the cornerstone for the prevention and management of NAFLD and should be recommended to every patient at risk or having established NAFLD. Despite the high prevalence of NAFLD, it should be recognized that the majority of patients will not develop liver-related complica...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Type 2 diabetes mellitus plays an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as an independent risk factor for severe fibrosis. PMID: 29893699 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Ann Hepatol Source Type: research
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by abnormal fat accumulation in liver cells and is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide [1,2]. It is closely associated with obesity and is one of the important etiologies of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure [3]. The development process of NAFLD can start from simple steatosis (NAFLD), become nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and finally lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of excessive alcohol intake [3,4].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by abnormal fat accumulation in liver cells and is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide [1, 2]. It is closely associated with obesity and is one of the important etiologies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver failure [3]. The development process of NAFLD can start from simple steatosis (NAFLD) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and finally leads to cirrhosis and HCC in the absence of excessive alcohol intake [3, 4].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
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