Advances in β-cell replacement therapy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes

Publication date: Available online 15 September 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Marie-Christine Vantyghem, Eelco J P de Koning, François Pattou, Michael R RickelsSummaryThe main goal of treatment for type 1 diabetes is to control glycaemia with insulin therapy to reduce disease complications. For some patients, technological approaches to insulin delivery are inadequate, and allogeneic islet transplantation is a safe alternative for those patients who have had severe hypoglycaemia complicated by impaired hypoglycaemia awareness or glycaemic lability, or who already receive immunosuppressive drugs for a kidney transplant. Since 2000, intrahepatic islet transplantation has proven efficacious in alleviating the burden of labile diabetes and preventing complications related to diabetes, whether or not a previous kidney transplant is present. Age, body-mass index, renal status, and cardiopulmonary status affect the choice between pancreas or islet transplantation. Access to transplantation is limited by the number of deceased donors and the necessity of immunosuppression. Future approaches might include alternative sources of islets (eg, xenogeneic tissue or human stem cells), extrahepatic sites of implantation (eg, omental, subcutaneous, or intramuscular), and induction of immune tolerance or encapsulation of islets.
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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