Sunday Sermonette: Law and Order

So God is dictating a detailed legal code to Moses. At this point in the fictitious history, it seems to be looking forward. It is more suitable to the settled people the Hebrews will become than the nomads of Genesis. We haven't been told anything about life in Goshen, but the people were not evidently self-governing. Currently, the people are camped out in the desert subsisting on manna. Moses was judging disputes, apparently based on his personal intuitions, until Jethro dropped in to suggest he delegate, at which point presumably his delegates made it up as they went along. So now we're finally getting the statutes.Where all this came from is not definitely known, but as we've mentioned many times Exodus was written down in the 6th Century BCE. The so-called Covenant Code we are now readingresembles the Code of Hammurabi, and other legal systems of the region in the first Millennium.  The general idea seems to be that the Covenant Code of Exodus was created by adding instructions regarding worship to the more general Canaanite legal system. The authors of Exodus set it at this point in the story to embed it securely in God's covenant with the Israelites. Anyway, here's Chapter 22. Unfortunately, the text of the RSV that I find on-line is garbled at the beginning. It omits some material and transposes verse 4.[a] When someone steals an ox or a sheep, and slaughters it or sells it, the thief shall pay five oxen for an ox, and four sheep for a sheep.[b] The thief shall ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

On today’s show, Gabe talks with Dr. Jessi Gold, a self-described misinformation crusader.  In addition to being a practicing psychiatrist, Dr. Gold’s career has focused on writing about mental health and mental illness for a lay audience. Join us as Gabe and Dr. Jessi talk about common sources of psychiatric misinformation, the perils of the supplement industry, how mental health and mental illness are often portrayed incorrectly in the popular media, and why she decided to pursue a very specific type of writing career. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW Guest information for ‘Dr. Jessi’ Podcast Episode...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Health-related Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Psychiatry Psychology The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Source Type: blogs
From SWOLF through EDA until heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, single-lead ECG, period tracking, sleep pattern analyzing: dozens of vital signs demonstrate that there’s no single square centimeter of the human body without quantifiable data. As an experiment, we tried to collect every trackable parameter to draw the boundaries of your “health data self”. Let us know if there’s anything left out. Why is measurement useful? To know thyself The famous ancient Greek aphorism was inscribed on a wall in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, the oracle, which was believed to tell human...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Personalized Medicine Portable Diagnostics activity blood body brain breathing data fitness health data heart health heart rate lifestyle lung measure measurement meditation quantified self s Source Type: blogs
You're reading 8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nootropics is a term coined by Dr. Corneliu E. Giurgea to describe a class of drugs, supplements, and other synthetic and naturally occurring compounds that improve cognitive function in our brains. They’re often called “smart drugs,” as they can help us think faster and more efficiently. Although used by pretty much everyone, these nootropic supplements are especially popular among youn...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement nootropics pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
Sometimes we just need a bit of support and help to feel and do better again. So today I’d like to share a collection of the best words of encouragement that I've found over the years. 145 supportive, kind and encouraging quotes that will help to: Lift you or a loved one up on a bad day (or a week when life is hard and you need to stay strong). Encourage you to take a leap and chance into something better. Kick-start your personal growth if you're in a rut. Direct your thoughts and emotions into a more positive, motivated and centered headspace once again. Words of Encouragement for a Bad Day (or Week) “What...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Personal Development Source Type: blogs
perto F, Gómez Rivas J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Burnout syndrome has increased dramatically in urology within recent years. A healthy lifestyle has been described as a protective factor. However, data on lifestyle is lacking among residents and urologists and remains to be elucidated. We aim to assess lifestyle among urology residents and young urologists across Europe. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Members of the European Society of Residents in Urology (ESRU) designed a 34-item online survey via surveymonkey.com. The survey was designed in accordance with Checklist for Reporting Results of Internet E-Surveys ...
Source: Actas Urologicas Espanolas - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Actas Urol Esp Source Type: research
So I’m thinking about signing a contract at a place that works 24h shifts. Now admittedly the hourly rate is lower than what I’m being offered in the city, but you usually get a few hours of sleep. Census is 13k with 12 hrs of APP coverage, docs average 1pph over a shift. My question for you guys is what is a reasonable number of 24s to do in a month without getting burned out? My urban offer is for 10x12s and this rural gig averages 6x24s. Since the hourly rate is a bit lower I was... 24 hr shifts
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Emergency Medicine Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 10 September 2019Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): John-Paul Taylor, Ian G McKeith, David J Burn, Brad F Boeve, Daniel Weintraub, Claire Bamford, Louise M Allan, Alan J Thomas, John T O'BrienSummaryDementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia, jointly known as Lewy body dementia, are common neurodegenerative conditions. Patients with Lewy body dementia present with a wide range of cognitive, neuropsychiatric, sleep, motor, and autonomic symptoms. Presentation varies between patients and can vary over time within an individual. Treatments can address one symptom but wors...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
These foods have been linked to better sleep as well as weight loss. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Weight gain has many underlying causes but one of the most common is something we all experience: stress. Whether it’s the, mild temporary kind caused by a traffic jam or major and chronic, triggered by a traumatic life event — stress is no friend to your waistline. It can set off physical and emotional changes that drive you to eat more, crave less nutritious, fattening comfort foods — and even gain weight much more easily. Stress-eating and cortisol “Stress drives up levels of a hormone called cortisol in the blood,” says Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Nutrition Stress Source Type: blogs
When most people think about sun-related damage, they probably worry about their skin. But the sun’s ultraviolet rays also pose a threat to a person’s eyes. According to a 2014 study funded by the U.S. National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, UV radiation can damage proteins in the eye’s lens. Over time, this damage can raise a person’s risk for cataracts, which impair vision. “When you don’t wear protection, ultraviolet radiation you cannot see is penetrating the eye, and the eye structures are very sensitive to it,” says Dr. Rebecca Taylor, a Nashville-b...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Lifestyle Source Type: news
More News: American Health | Burns | Child Abuse | Children | Egypt Health | Legislation | Meat | Men | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Trump | USA Health