Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium Scientific and Data Coordinating Center (U24 Clinical Trial Optional)

The Prevention of Lower Urinary tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium will use qualitative and quantitative strategies to conduct collaborative, transdisciplinary studies to establish the scientific basis for future intervention studies to promote bladder health and prevent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and associated bladder conditions such as bladder infections, urinary incontinence, voiding dysfunction, overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome in adolescent and adult women across the life course. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite applications for the Scientific and Data Center to build on foundational work to establish a longitudinal cohort study with the intent of identifying plausible targets for future intervention studies. The consortium will also conduct a range of additional studies to facilitate the success of future intervention and implementation studies.RFA-DK-19-016
Source: NIDDK Funding Opportunities - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: funding

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Funding Opportunity RFA-DK-19-015 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Prevention of Lower Urinary tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium will use qualitative and quantitative strategies to conduct collaborative, transdisciplinary studies to establish the scientific basis for future intervention studies to promote bladder health and prevent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and associated bladder conditions such as bladder infections, urinary incontinence, voiding dysfunction, overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome in adolescent and adult women across the life course. This FOA ...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
Funding Opportunity RFA-DK-19-016 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Prevention of Lower Urinary tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium will use qualitative and quantitative strategies to conduct collaborative, transdisciplinary studies to establish the scientific basis for future intervention studies to promote bladder health and prevent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and associated bladder conditions such as bladder infections, urinary incontinence, voiding dysfunction, overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome in adolescent and adult women across the life course. The purpo...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
The Prevention of Lower Urinary tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium will use qualitative and quantitative strategies to conduct collaborative, transdisciplinary studies to establish the scientific basis for future intervention studies to promote bladder health and prevent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and associated bladder conditions such as bladder infections, urinary incontinence, voiding dysfunction, overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome in adolescent and adult women across the life course. This FOA is to invite applications for Clinical Research Centers to build on foundational...
Source: NIDDK Funding Opportunities - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: funding
This study also found that Proteus DNA, a genus with many uropathogenic species (Drzewiecka, 2016), was more prevalent in women with OAB compared to asymptomatic controls (Curtiss et al., 2017). IC A recent study by Abernethy et al. suggested that the microbiome may play a role in IC (Abernethy et al., 2017). In this study, 16S rRNA analysis determined the microbiome of catheterized urine from women (n = 40) with IC was not dominated by a single genus and was less likely to contain Lactobacillus compared to asymptomatic women. Abernethy et al. also showed that L. acidophilus was associated with less severe scores on the ...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Kate V. Meriwether1*, Zhenmin Lei1, Rajbir Singh2, Jeremy Gaskins3, Deslyn T. G. Hobson1 and Venkatakrishna Jala2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States 3Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (ICBPS) may be related to an altered genitourinary microbiome. Our aim was to compare the vaginal and urinary microbiomes b...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
To investigate the efficacy and safety of noninvasive intravesical instillation of onabotulinum toxin-A (OBTX-A) through systematic review and meta-analysis. Recently, several studies of noninvasive intravesical instillation of OBTX-A have been published. However, its efficacy is not well validated yet compared to well-known efficacy of minimally invasive intravesical injection of OBTX-A.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Female Urology, Urodynamics, Incontinence, and Pelvic Floor Reconstructive Surgery Source Type: research
This article will review the effect of oral contraceptive pills on bladder symptoms.Recent FindingsOral contraceptives appear to decrease the risk of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The effect of OCP on recurrent UTI, OAB/UUI is unclear. Combined oral contraceptives may be implicated in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.SummaryThere appears to be a link between changes in estrogen and progesterone levels and lower urinary tract symptoms. While many studies have evaluated the effect of hormones on the genitourinary tract and bladder function in postmenopausal women menopause, further studies are needed to direc...
Source: Current Bladder Dysfunction Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewSacral neuromodulation (SNM) is an FDA-approved treatment option for several refractory pelvic floor disorders given its efficacy and safety profile. Over the past several years, numerous papers have been published on SNM ’s long-term outcomes, emerging new indications, comparisons with other treatment options, and cost effectiveness. Therefore, we aim to review these updates to the SNM literature.Recent FindingsA PUBMED ® and MEDLINE® search was performed for scientific publications on “sacral neuromodulation” and “sacral nerve stimulation” between 2011 and 20...
Source: Current Bladder Dysfunction Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
To identify differences in urodynamic parameters between female outpatients with interstitial cystitis (IC) and/or bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and severe overactive bladder (OAB).
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Female Urology, Urodynamics, Incontinence, and Pelvic Floor Reconstructive Surgery Source Type: research
OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNTA) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of urinary incontinence due to neurogenic detrusor overactivity and for the treatment of refractory overactive bladder. As a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, onaBoNTA showed no difference over placebo in recently published studies. In contrast, treating interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) with onaBoNTA has shown efficacy, and the current American Urological Association guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of IC/BPS lists onaBoNTA as fourth-line treatment.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
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