Infographic: Scalp cooling therapy

Learn more about chemotherapy and hair loss. More healthtip infographics:?mayohealthhighlights.startribune.com
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

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Authors: Xu J, Li D, Du K, Wang J Abstract Background: Cinobufacin is a Chinese patent medicine widely used for breast cancer in China. However, no systematic review and meta-analysis have been published to validate its effects in breast cancer treatment. We, therefore, summarize the efficacy and safety of Cinobufacin combined with chemotherapy in order to provide rigid evidence for its clinical application. Methods: By searching multiple databases incepted to December 2019, the RCTs of breast cancer patients treated with Cinobufacin were screened according to the inclusion criteria, and the meta-analysis and s...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Background: The population-based Dutch Cancer Registry shows that 60% of patients with breast cancer received chemotherapy and 99% of these treatments are known to introduce severe alopecia. Worldwide scalp cooling is being implemented to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). FDA clearance has been approved for scalp cooling among breast cancer patients in 2015. It is heading towards standard care as it is added to the NCCN guideline for breast cancer in 2019.
Source: European Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: POSTERS A: Supportive and Palliative Care Including End of Life Treatment Source Type: research
Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Post-operative chemotherapy plays an essential role in preventing recurrence and metastasis in patients with breast cancer. Since breast cancer chemotherapy has markedly improved in efficacy and has become more widely used, it is being administered to increasing numbers of patients. However, many patients may decline treatment because they are anxious about adverse effects, in particular hair loss. Cyclophosphamide, anthracycline, and taxane agents commonly cause hair loss, nausea, vomiting, and fever.
Source: European Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: POSTERS A: Supportive and Palliative Care Including End of Life Treatment Source Type: research
To conduct an integrative scoping review of the physical, psychological and social experiences of women who have experienced chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA).
Source: European Journal of Oncology Nursing - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Skin Toxicity: Clinical Summary of the ONS Guidelines™ for Cancer Treatment-Related Skin Toxicity. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2020 Oct 01;24(5):561-565 Authors: Wiley K, Ebanks GL, Shelton G, Strelo J, Ciccolini K Abstract Cancer treatment-related skin toxicities are a frequent and distressing side effect of antineoplastic therapies, especially chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Skin toxicities associated with these therapies can include rashes, hand-foot skin reaction, hand-foot syndrome, and hair loss. These symptoms cause not only physical pain and discomfort but also psychological distress, and th...
Source: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Clin J Oncol Nurs Source Type: research
Conditions:   Alopecia;   Chemotherapy-Induced Change;   Hair Loss;   Alopecia Drugs Intervention:   Drug: Keratinocyte growth factor Sponsor:   University of Arizona Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
CONCLUSIONS: Severe CIA occurred in all 68 patients who received FEC and taxane chemotherapy. The present findings provide the first data demonstrating that age was not associated with the degree or incidence of hair loss, but age affected the recovery from CIA. These results contribute more accurate information provision and insights regarding the proper treatment of CIA. PMID: 32944881 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Breast Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The results of current study showed that in patients with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma, FOLFOX regimen compared to mDCF regimen have similar ORR, OS and PFS. Toxicity rate are also lower in FOLFOX group, thus it seems a better regimen for chemotherapy.. PMID: 32856863 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev Source Type: research
ONS Guidelines™ for Cancer Treatment-Related Skin Toxicity. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2020 Sep 01;47(5):539-556 Authors: Williams LA, Ginex PK, Ebanks GL, Ganstwig K, Ciccolini K, Kwong BK, Robison J, Shelton G, Strelo J, Wiley K, Maloney C, Moriarty KA, Vrabel M, Morgan RL Abstract BACKGROUND: Management of cancer treatment-related skin toxicities can minimize treatment disruptions and improve patient well-being. OBJECTIVES: This guideline aims to support patients and clinicians in decisions regarding management of cancer treatment-related skin toxicities. METHODS: A panel developed a guideli...
Source: Oncology Nursing Forum - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Oncol Nurs Forum Source Type: research
Abstract PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: Preventing and managing skin toxicities can minimize treatment disruptions and improve well-being. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention and management of cancer treatment-related skin toxicities. LITERATURE SEARCH: The authors systematically searched for comparative studies published before April 1, 2019. Study selection and appraisal were conducted by pairs of independent reviewers. DATA EVALUATION: The random-effects model was used to conduct meta-analysis when appropriate. SYNTHESIS: 39 studies (6,006 patie...
Source: Oncology Nursing Forum - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Oncol Nurs Forum Source Type: research
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