Development and function of group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

Development and function of group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Curr Opin Immunol. 2013 Apr;25(2):148-55 Authors: Walker JA, McKenzie ANj Abstract The innate lymphoid cell (ILC) family has recently expanded with the discovery of type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2). These cells arise from lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and, under the control of the transcriptional regulators RORα and Gata3, they mature to give rise to IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 producing ILC2. These cells are critical components of the innate immune response to parasitic worm infections and have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergy. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of ILC2 development and function now present the opportunity to develop new genetic models to assess ILC2 immune function and to investigate possible therapeutic interventions. PMID: 23562755 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Current Opinion in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Immunol Source Type: research

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