Seven Creative Approaches to Health Workforce Challenges

By The Editorial Team, IntraHealth InternationalSeptember 13, 2019Over the course of our 40-year history, IntraHealth International has consistently designed creative solutions to health workforce challenges. From new technologies to old-fashioned human storytelling, we find new solutions to longstanding problems.  In a new technical publication, we highlight seven examples of how and why we look for new ways to get results. Here’s a sneak peak of what’s inside The Future of Global Health Starts Here: 7 Creative Approaches to Health Workforce Challenges. Funding the Next Generation of Health Workers in Kenya The low-interest student loan program Afya Elimu is a public-private partnership that serves future nurses, clinical officers, medical laboratory technicians, pharmaceutical technologists, nutritionists, health record information officers, and public health officers—cadres that form the bulk of the health workforce in Kenya and are critical to achieving universal health coverage.  Communicating with Health Workers on the Front Lines of Pandemics In 2014, during the world’s largest-ever outbreak of the Ebola virus, IntraHealth and UNICEF used existing iHRIS software to create mHero—a platform for health workers and health officials to stay connected via SMS messaging during the pandemic. Building a Culture of Qual...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Family Planning & Reproductive Health HIV AIDS Noncommunicable Diseases Digital Health Education Performance Policy Advocacy Health Workforce Systems Health Workers Source Type: news

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Are digital contact tracing technologies effective during infectious disease outbreaks?Why is this question important?The global COVID-19 pandemic highlights the importance of accurate and timely contact tracing. Contact tracing tells people that they may have been near someone with - or showing symptoms of - an infectious disease, allowing them to self-isolate and helping to stop the spread of infection. Traditionally, contact tracing begins with notification that someone has an infectious disease. They are asked to recall their contacts, going back two to three days before symptom onset. This is time-consuming and may no...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
Religions for Peace Interreligious Council of Albania distributing Covid relief supplies from the Multi-religious Humanitarian Fund. Credit: Erzen CarjaBy Prof. Azza KaramNEW YORK, Aug 4 2020 (IPS) — I have never been interested in religion or spirituality before, but I found myself tuning in to all sorts of on-line religion and spirituality related forums “in search of something.” These are the words of a 30-something single young, middle class man (born into a Protestant-Catholic family background) in a European country. The latter is known more for turning several churches into museums or shopping ce...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Civil Society Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
(WASHINGTON) — Once a coronavirus vaccine is approved as safe and effective, Americans should have widespread access within a reasonable time, Dr. Anthony Fauci assured lawmakers Friday. Appearing before a House panel investigating the nation’s response to the pandemic, Fauci expressed “cautious” optimism that a vaccine would be available, particularly by next year. “I believe, ultimately, over a period of time in 2021, that Americans will be able to get it,” Fauci said, referring to the vaccine. There will be a priority list for who gets early vaccinations. “I don’t think we...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Congress COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Jul 16 2020 (IPS) Announcing an independent evaluation of the global Covid-19 response on 9th July, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus asked why it has been “difficult for humans to unite and fight a common enemy that is killing people indiscriminately?”. Anis Chowdhury He warned: “The greatest threat we face now is not the virus itself. Rather, it is the lack of leadership and solidarity at the global and national levels… we cannot defeat this pandemic as a divided world”, highlight...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Read the full case study here   INCREASING EPIDEMIC FREQUENCY There’s mounting evidence that the rates of infectious disease outbreaks have been increasing in frequency over the past few years. Perhaps even in the past two decades. From the period of the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918 to the HIV/AIDS epidemic around 1981, there were only six pandemics on record. Approximately one per decade. However, since the SARS outbreak of 2002, there has been an increased frequency of outbreaks. The records show that SARS was quickly followed by several recurring and new outbreaks. AVIAN flu, MARBURG virus, SWINE flu, MERS, a...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Case studies News Reviews Source Type: blogs
Cuba's Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute:Battling COVID-19 One Study, One Test, One Patient at a Time. MEDICC Rev. 2020 Jan;22(2):40-44 Authors: Coutin G, Bacallao-Gallestey J, Castellanos-Serra L Abstract This MEDICC Review roundtable brings you specialists from Havana's Pedro Kourí Tropical Medicine Institute (IPK), who are working directly with testing, research and patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Founded in 1937 by its namesake, the Institute has gained considerable worldwide prestige. Today, it is a PAHO-WHO Collaborating Center for the Study of Dengue and Its Vector...
Source: MEDICC Review - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: MEDICC Rev Source Type: research
By Carol Bales , Advocacy and policy communications manager, IntraHealth International ; Casey Bishopp, Communications officer, IntraHealth InternationalMay 22, 2020Here in North Carolina, we all know someone who works in health care. Maybe there’s a nurse in your family, a physician, a data clerk, a pharmacist.These“frontline health workers” are in the spotlight right now as they face unprecedented dangers during every shift they work.Frontline health workers are literally putting themselves on the line—at great personal risk—to respond to COVID-19, stop its spread, and save their patient...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases COVID-19 Advocacy Health Workers Source Type: news
By Katherine Seaton, Editorial OfficerMay 04, 2020Data systems are crucial for health care all the time, but during a natural disaster, war, or pandemic like COVID-19, functioning data systems can mean the difference between life and death.Data help us know what the health needs are, what capabilities each nearby hospital and clinic has, and where health workers should be deployed. Essential for responding to a pandemic, these data help monitor the spread and intensity of disease and help everyone, not just health workers, understand its severity and impact on society.If the systems are operating smoothly, we don’t...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Digital Health Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news
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