Management of drug-resistant tuberculosis

Publication date: 14–20 September 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 394, Issue 10202Author(s): Christoph Lange, Keertan Dheda, Dumitru Chesov, Anna Maria Mandalakas, Zarir Udwadia, C Robert HorsburghSummaryDrug-resistant tuberculosis is a major public health concern in many countries. Over the past decade, the number of patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to the most effective drugs against tuberculosis (ie, rifampicin and isoniazid), which is called multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, has continued to increase. Globally, 4·6% of patients with tuberculosis have multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, but in some areas, like Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, and Ukraine, this proportion exceeds 25%. Treatment for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is prolonged (ie, 9–24 months) and patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis have less favourable outcomes than those treated for drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Individualised multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment with novel (eg, bedaquiline) and repurposed (eg, linezolid, clofazimine, or meropenem) drugs and guided by genotypic and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing can improve treatment outcomes. Some clinical trials are evaluating 6-month regimens to simplify management and improve outcomes of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Here we review optimal diagnostic and treatment strategies for patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis and their contacts.
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

Related Links:

Source: Infection and Drug Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infection and Drug Resistance Source Type: research
A 25 year-old tuberculosis patient is treated at her home in Funafuti, the main island of Tuvalu in the South Pacific. Credit: UNDP Tuvalu/Aurélia Rusek.By External SourceUNITED NATIONS, Oct 17 2019 (IPS) A staggering 1.5 million people died from tuberculosis (TB) last year, the UN health agency said on Thursday, in an appeal for far greater funding and political support to eradicate the curable and preventable disease. Caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TB commonly causes persistent coughing, fatigue and weight loss. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and its latest Global TB Report, a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news
Antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) is used to deliver antimycobacterial agents into the focal lesion of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Although kanamycin is currently used as an antimycobacterial agent for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, there is no information about its suitability in ALBC.
Source: The Journal of Arthroplasty - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
Source: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
Source: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
Source: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: CORRESPONDENCE Source Type: research
The World Health Organization (WHO) recently launched the consolidated guidelines on drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) treatment [1]. They include a new drug classification to manage rifampicin-resistant (RR) and multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB, while proposing either a shorter regimen (including injectable drugs) or a longer all-oral one as the recommended treatment options. Efficient diagnostic tools are presently available to diagnose resistance to second-line drugs within a few hours (instead of the weeks previously needed) [2]. Therefore, the challenge for National TB Programmes is now to capture these new recommendati...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
Resistance against first-line drugs for treating tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health challenge that hampers the World Health Organization (WHO)'s End TB strategy [1]. The End TB strategy aims to reduce TB deaths by 95% and new TB cases by 90% between 2015 and 2035. In 2017, the WHO recorded 558 000 cases (range 483 000–639 000) of TB not treatable with rifampicin, the most effective first-line anti-TB drug. Of these, 82% cases were of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) [2].
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
This article summarizes the milestones in the development of pretomanid leading to this first regulatory approval.
Source: Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can cause the terrible tuberculosis (TB), which is reported as one of the most dreadful epidemic. Although many biochemical molecular drugs have been developed to cope with this disease, the drug resistance-especially the multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistance (XDR)-poses a huge threat to the treatment. However, traditional biochemical experimental method to tackle TB is time-consuming and costly. Benefited by the appearance of the enormous genomic and proteomic sequence data, TB can be treated via sequence-based biological computational approach-bioinfo...
Source: Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Med Chem Source Type: research
More News: Bedaquiline | Clinical Trials | General Medicine | International Medicine & Public Health | Kazakhstan Health | Kyrgyzstan Health | Linezolid | Moldova Health | Multidrug Resistance | Tuberculosis | Ukraine Health | Zyvox