The Week That Wasn't: Reverse Aging, Lyme Test, Apple Health Studies The Week That Wasn't: Reverse Aging, Lyme Test, Apple Health Studies

Three medical stories that we didn't cover, explained.Medscape
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Article Source Type: news

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The first human Lyme vaccine was pulled off the market nearly 20 years ago. A new effort faces lingering suspicions.Undark
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
Larissa A. Martins1, Camila D. Malossi1†, Maria F. B. de M. Galletti1†, José M. Ribeiro2, André Fujita3, Eliane Esteves4, Francisco B. Costa5, Marcelo B. Labruna5, Sirlei Daffre1 and Andréa C. Fogaça1* 1Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 2Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD, United States 3Departamento de Ciência da Computação, Instituto de Matemática e Estatística,...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Charlotte Mason1, Xiaoyan Liu2, Spoorthy Prabhudeva1 and Zhiming Ouyang1* 1Department of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States 2Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States BosR, a Fur family member, is essential for the pathogenesis of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. Unlike typical Fur proteins in which DNA binding represses gene expression, binding of BosR to the rpoS promoter directly activates rpoS transcription in B. burgdorferi. However, virtually nothing is known concerning potential structural fea...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Tania Rahman1,2†‡, Andrew S. Brown2‡, Elizabeth L. Hartland1‡, Ian R. van Driel2* and Ka Yee Fung1†‡ 1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia We have examined the influence of depleting plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in mice on the immune response to the gut pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, an organism tha...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This article originally appeared on Health.com
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
You have a chronic illness that is debilitating and requires meticulous management. Which is hard enough. But you also have an invisible illness—like fibromyalgia, diabetes, Lyme disease, IBS, or something very rare. On the outside, on most days, you look fine, even perfectly healthy. But on the inside, you’re struggling with unbearable migraines, knock-you-off-your-feet fatigue, dangerous digestive issues, severe pain and much more. Because people don’t see these symptoms, they misunderstand what’s going on, which leads you to feel judged and lonely. And these people might include everyone from med...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders General Health-related Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Chronic Illness Chronic Pain Coping Skills Resilience Source Type: blogs
Patient Presentation A 9-year-old male came to clinic with a 1 month history of painful joint swelling. One month ago he started having right ankle pain that was intermittent but consistent. One day ago his right wrist, right ankle and bilateral knees had some swelling but no erythema or warmth. He says that he has pain in them when he moves but not when he is resting and he denies any joint stiffness or gelling. He also had 1-2 days of multiple red skin lesions on his extremities and trunk, not overlying the affected joints. The skin lesions do not come and go and do not itch. They are mainly discrete circular lesions wi...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Reading the recent letter from Stone et  al1 reminded us of a subject from our previous galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) study. Indeed, she may well be the same 76-year-old lady found in the letter (Table E1) who was reported as negative to alpha-gal. Her first reaction to meat started 45 minutes after eating barbecue, only a few months following her recovery from Lyme disease.2,3 Since then she has had multiple reactions of varying severity, some of which started less than 1 hour after ingestion of red meat.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Conclusion Through relatively small amounts of grant support over the last 6 y, CRSCI has helped local public health agencies in sixteen states and two cities—whose combined population reaches half of the U.S. total—identify critical climate impacts and vulnerable populations. In the process, the program has helped to integrate health more fully into local climate change efforts. As a result of CRSCI support, these local public health agencies—the backbone of public health climate response capacity—have tools to enhance real-life adaptive capacity and increase the effectiveness of existing intervent...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Brief Communication Source Type: research
By Megan Molteni for WIRED. First comes the unscratchable itching, and the angry blossoming of hives. Then stomach cramping, and — for the unluckiest few — difficulty breathing, passing out, and even death. In the last decade and a half, thousands of previously protein-loving Americans have developed a dangerous allergy to meat. And they all have one thing in common: the lone star tick. Red meat, you might be surprised to know, isn’t totally sugar-free. It contains a few protein-linked saccharides, including one called galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, or alpha-gal, for short. More and more people are lear...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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