High Rates of Oropharynx Cancer Tied to HPV

Data from a new study show the importance of taking preventative measures against contracting human papillomavirus, including urging patients to get the HPV vaccine.
Source: CancerNetwork - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: news

Related Links:

n Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of a growing percentage of head and neck cancers (HNC); primarily, a subset of oral squamous cell carcinoma, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The majority of HPV-associated head and neck cancers (HPV + HNC) are caused by HPV16; additionally, co-factors such as smoking and immunosuppression contribute to the progression of HPV + HNC by interfering with tumor suppressor miRNA and impairing mediators of the immune system. This review summarizes current studies on HPV + HNC, ranging from potential modes of oral transmission of ...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Authors: Okunade KS Abstract Cervical cancer is by far the most common HPV-related disease. About 99.7% of cervical cancer cases are caused by persistent genital high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Worldwide, cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women with an estimated 528,000 new cases reported in 2012. Most HPV infections clear spontaneously but persistent infection with the oncogenic or high-risk types may cause cancer of the oropharynx and anogenital regions. The virus usually infects the mucocutaneous epithelium and produces viral particles in matured epithelial cells and then cause...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
This article focuses on the epidemiology, transmission, risk factors, and clinical presentation of HPV-associated oropharyngeal SCC, and provides an update on HPV vaccination in the context of the new head and neck cancer epidemic.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants - Category: Primary Care Tags: CME: Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractIn the U.S. there is an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One of the most prevalent STIs is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Certain high risk strains of HPV are believed to cause virtually all cervical cancers, over 90% of anal cancers, 70% of oropharyngeal cancers, and the majority of anal  genital warts. HPV is preventable through vaccination and is available for both men and women. Several educational interventions have been employed, yet baseline awareness and knowledge related to HPV and 9vHPV remains relatively low among young men. What is not known is the most effective method for provid...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes nearly all cervical cancers and some cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx (1).* Most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously within 1 to 2 years; however, persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to development of precancer or cancer (2). In the United States, the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) is available to protect against oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 as well as nononcogenic types 6 and 11 that cause genital warts. CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS)† to assess the incide...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) initiates ~5% of all human cancers, and particularly cervical and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV vaccines prevent HPV infection, but do not eliminate existing HPV infections. Papillomaviruses induce hyperproliferation of epithelial cells. In this review we discuss how hyperproliferation renders epithelial cells less sensitive to immune attack, and impacts upon the efficiency of the local immune system. These observations have significance for the design of therapeutic HPV cancer immunotherapies.
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions Increased HPV vaccination coverage in California is needed to reduce economic and health burdens associated with cancers caused by HPV infection.
Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Category: Sexual Medicine Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Although human papillomavirus (HPV) strains had previously been described in the literature, the earliest published evidence of the link between HPV and cervical cancer dates to 1983 by Harald zur Hausen and colleagues [1]. Since then, over 200 HPV genotypes have been described [2], and the 2008 Nobel Prize was awarded to zur Hausen for his pioneering work in the field. HPV is a common virus that is efficiently transmitted by sexual exposure and skin-to-skin contact [2]. Certain genotypes of HPV (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, and 68) are categorized as high-risk (HR) due to their causative association...
Source: Cancer Treatment Reviews - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Anti-Tumour Treatment Source Type: research
By Jacqueline Howard, CNN (CNN) — The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, known as ACIP, voted unanimously on Wednesday to recommend HPV vaccines for both boys and girls and men and women through age 26. Previously the CDC recommended that teen girls and young women who had not been adequately vaccinated receive the human papillomavirus vaccine through age 26, but the recommendation for teen boys and young men only went through age 21. The CDC’s recommendation that children start receiving two doses of the HPV vaccine around 11 or 12...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN HPV vaccine Source Type: news
This study included the participation of students from 15 dental programs (n = 380) with an overall response rate of 28%. Although the results cannot be generalized to the entire population of dental students in the USA, most students had inadequate overall HPV knowledge (65%), HPV-OPC knowledge (80%), and HPV vaccination knowledge (55%). While all student groups displa yed adequate general HPV knowledge levels (≥ 70% correct responses), gender, racial, religious, age, and regional differences were observed. Future dental professionals need to have adequate levels of HPV knowledge to aid in reducing...
Source: Journal of Cancer Education - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Vaccines | Cervical Cancer Vaccine | Genital Warts | Human Papillomavirus (HPV) | Legislation | Oropharyngeal Cancer | Study | Vaccines