Hello From the Year 2050. We Avoided the Worst of Climate Change — But Everything Is Different

Let’s imagine for a moment that we’ve reached the middle of the century. It’s 2050, and we have a moment to reflect—the climate fight remains the consuming battle of our age, but its most intense phase may be in our rearview mirror. And so we can look back to see how we might have managed to dramatically change our society and economy. We had no other choice. There was a point after 2020 when we began to collectively realize a few basic things. One, we weren’t getting out of this unscathed. Climate change, even in its early stages, had begun to hurt: watching a California city literally called Paradise turn into hell inside of two hours made it clear that all Americans were at risk. When you breathe wildfire smoke half the summer in your Silicon Valley fortress, or struggle to find insurance for your Florida beach house, doubt creeps in even for those who imagined they were immune. Two, there were actually some solutions. By 2020, renewable energy was the cheapest way to generate electricity around the planet—in fact, the cheapest way there ever had been. The engineers had done their job, taking sun and wind from quirky backyard DIY projects to cutting-edge technology. Batteries had plummeted down the same cost curve as renewable energy, so the fact that the sun went down at night no longer mattered quite so much—you could store its rays to use later. And the third realization? People began to understand that the biggest reason we we...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Climate 2019 climate change Source Type: news

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When most people think about E coli, the first thing that comes to mind likely is eating tainted food or as a result of improper handwashing. What came as a surprise to me was that it can also show up as a UTI (Urinary Tract Infection) caused by kidney stones that back up in the urethra, which prohibits the flow of urine. It is more than an academic exercise that had me researching this all too common condition in men and women. As I am writing, I am less than 24 hours post-surgery to remove these pesky critters that have been backing up the works since 2014. It was my fourth go around that culminated in a cystoscopy,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health-related Personal caregiving Source Type: blogs
The future of healthcare is shaping up in front of our very eyes with advances in digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence, VR/AR, 3D-printing, robotics or nanotechnology. We have to familiarize with the latest developments in order to be able to control technology and not the other way around. The future of healthcare lies in working hand-in-hand with technology and healthcare workers have to embrace emerging technologies in order to stay relevant in the coming years. Be bold, curious and informed! Are you afraid that robots will take over the jobs of nurses, doctors and other healthcare professionals? Are y...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing AI artificial intelligence augmented reality genetics Health Healthcare nanotechnology Personalized medicine pharma pharmacology robotics virtual reality wearables GC1 Source Type: blogs
The health tracking market is booming. What with smart bracelets, smart beds and smart chest straps, the tracking industry has penetrated the lives of old and young from the time they wake up in the morning to the time they hit the bed at night (and beyond). It’s no wonder that user penetration is projected to reach 25% of the adult population by 2022 in the US alone and that these devices are being adopted by over 30% of individuals across all age groups. Naturally, I count among those adopters. I call myself a data geek, using the data accumulated from myriads of health trackers to help me make more informed hea...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers digital health digital technology health data digital health sensors Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Learning how to pay attention to our attention (meta-attention) can be transformative. Using principles from cognitive science, we can create a comprehensive approach (attention capital theory in medicine) to reclaim the meaning and joy that has been depleted from our profession. Increasing the difficulty of our work to match our skill level, delegating low-level tasks to help us focus on critical steps in our physician zone, creating rules to eliminate distractions, and noticing both the wonder and suffering around us may be more important than resilience training or wellness modules. Although well-intention...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Burnout physician burnout physician wellness Sanj Katyal Source Type: blogs
Marissa Fayer, a 20-year medtech executive, entrepreneur, and philanthropist stopped in to speak with MD+DI about the changes she has seen in healthcare and how women have helped shaped the medtech industry. She is the CEO and founder of non-profit HERHealthEQ and the president of advisory firm Fayer Consulting LLC,. MD+DI: You’ve made a tremendous impact in the healthcare industry – but tell me what led you to this field? Also, when you started your career how did the landscape in the profession look? Was it particularly diverse? How has it changed since you first started? Y...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
The last man that used the words “I love you” used them to control me.  He used them by not saying it back, ever, when I said it.  He used them by smugly making me say it when he wanted to hear it.  He used them by only ever saying them himself when I would work up the strength to try to end things.   He used them to make me feel bad when I didn’t “behave” how he wanted me to.  He used them to convince me of a false future that he had no intention of ever providing.  The words “I love you” meant absolutely nothing. They were alternately a crowba...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Codependence Narcissism Personal Stories Relationships & Love Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Breakups Emotional Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: news
By ANDY MYCHKOVSKY In this post, I write down all my strategy and business development knowledge in healthcare and organize it into the top 9 commandments for selling as a healthcare startup. I think everyone from the founder to the most junior person on the team should know these pillars because all startups must grow. I should also note these tenets are most applicable for selling into large enterprise healthcare incumbents (e.g., payers, providers, medical device, drug companies). Although I appreciate the direct-to-consumer game, these slices are less applicable for that domain. If your startup needs help developing...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: The Business of Health Care Andy Mychkovsky business development health startups Healthcare Pizza Tech Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Herpes simplex virus hepatitis causes significant morbidity, and pregnant women are susceptible to severe infections. Pregnant or peripartum women with acute febrile hepatitis require prompt evaluation for HSV with serum PCR screening. PMID: 31923059 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
What are some short 10-15 minute lessons y'all do for your enlisted medical (Corpsmen/Medics)? I'm looking for things that they'll find either interesting, useful in their job, or both. This is separate from skills training. Stuff like acute pain control, back pain red flags and what they mean, the approach to a red eye, upper respiratory/sinus complaints, "it burns when I pee," etc.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Military Medicine Source Type: forums
(The Physiological Society) New research shows how second-degree burns cause hard-to-treat chronic pain, and this understanding may be key to treating these complications, common in war veterans This research, published in Physiological Reports, suggests that burns cause changes to neurons in multiple parts of the spinal cord, even far from the injury site, which can contribute to chronic pain and other long-term complications.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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