A Novel Medial Canthal Reconstruction Technique in Children With Blepharophimosis Syndrome

Conclusions: This is a safe, effective, and reproducible technique, with minimal morbidity and rapid postoperative recovery in children. It produces cosmetically acceptable scars and a strong stable reconstruction of the medial canthal insertion.
Source: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Surgical Techniques Source Type: research

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Nasotracheal intubation is routinely used in patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial surgery when intermaxillary fixation is needed either intraoperatively or postoperative. Various complications can occur such as epistaxis, turbinectomy, retropharyngeal dissection, tympanites, and nasal alar pressure sores or necrosis, especially when there is a prolonged nasotracheal intubation. The first report of a nasal alar necrosis after prolonged nasotracheal intubation was published by Hatcher et al in 1968. Since then several reports of skin necrosis of the nasal alar region have been published and attributed to a prolonged op...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Lesions involving the masseteric and buccal spaces have traditionally required transoral or transcervical approaches. Herein, the authors describe the successful endonasal endoscopic resection of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) with significant extension into the masseteric and buccal spaces facilitated by transoral finger retraction. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are hypervascular tumors originating in the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) with complex relationships to skull base and orbital structures. Endoscopic approaches have allowed for resection of JNAs with excellent visualization and without traditi...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Conclusions: The transcaruncular endoscopic approach is a promising technique with no outer scarring. It is convenient in patients with difficult orientation in the nasal cavity, relatively safe, and faster than the transnasal endoscopic approach
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Technical Strategies Source Type: research
ConclusionDiagnosis of PMT of the paranasal sinuses causing oncogenous osteomalacia requires a high index of suspicion when there are no ENT symptoms. Appropriate biochemical tests and histopathology lead to the correct diagnosis. Total endoscopic surgical excision leads to a good outcome.
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Ligation of the sphenopalatine and posterior nasal arteries is indicated for posterior epistaxis as initial treatment or when conservative measures fail. In some patients, a transnasal approach or its alternative transantral approach are not possible due to tumor filling the nasal corridor, pterygopalatine fossa, or maxillary sinus. Aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility of endoscopically assisted transoral approach for the ligation of the maxillary artery (MA). Six fresh cadaver specimens (12 sides), previously prepared with intravascular injections of colored latex, were dissected. A combined transnasal and transo...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusion: The rate of intra- and postoperative complications following Le Fort I osteotomy for healthy noncleft adults in our center was low. Therefore, it can be concluded that this technique is safe and reliable. The maxillofacial surgeon should pay more attention for prevention or even management of the risk of intra- and perioperative complications in patients with anatomic irregularities (previous craniofacial cleft or trauma history) and those who required maxillary setback concomitant with impaction movements.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
We examined the clinical outcome of patients with antrum neoplasms. Medical records were obtained for all patients diagnosed with a sinus malignancy between July 2009 and January 2014. During this period, 41 patients with maxillary tumours were treated, among which 9 patients received a maxillectomy. There were 21 male and 20 female patients. All patients underwent computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The most common complications were postoperative epistaxis and swallowing difficulty. The treatment of maxillary antrum tumours is complicated and needs advancements to improve early presentation, timely diagnos...
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Embolization is a common treatment modality for refractory epistaxis. Here, the authors reported that the first patient with unilateral necrosis of the mucosa overlying the hard palate developed after embolization of ascending palatine artery. A 46-year-old man with a history of maxillofacial trauma complicated by 2 episodes of significant unilateral epistaxis. Although he did not experience any epistaxis after embolization, unilateral necrosis of the mucosa overlying the hard palate developed gradually 2 weeks after embolization. The necrotic tissue of hard palate was treated by surgical debridement and followed by antibiotic and analgesic.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Conclusion: In the setting of recurrent and/or delayed postoperative epistaxis following Le Fort I osteotomy, surgeons should maintain a high clinical suspicion for PA. Ruptured PA's are often preceded by multiple episodes of progressively worsening epistaxis. Based on the presented case report and pooled data from the literature, angiography is recommended to evaluate for PA in the setting of recurrent epistaxis following Le Fort I osteotomy, especially within the first 4 weeks following surgery.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
Conclusions: The presentation of patients with epistaxis at German ENT practices shows a marked seasonal variation with a low in the summer, an increase in fall and winter, and a peak in February, March, and April.
Source: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: Brief Clinical Studies Source Type: research
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