Therapeutic strategies for social anxiety disorder: where are we now?

Therapeutic strategies for social anxiety disorder: where are we now? Expert Rev Neurother. 2019 Sep 10;: Authors: Pelissolo A, Abou Kassm S, Delhay L Abstract Introduction: Classical well-established treatments of social anxiety disorder (SAD) are now complemented by more recent therapeutic strategies. This review aims to summarize available therapies for SAD and discuss recent evidence-based findings on the management of this disorder. Areas covered: Recent guidelines recommend psychotherapy, particularly cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and pharmacotherapy, as first-line treatments of patients with SAD, without a clear superiority of one option over the other. CBT includes classical approaches such as in vivo exposure to social situations and cognitive therapy, but new modalities and techniques have been recently developed: third-wave approaches, internet-delivered therapy, virtual reality exposure, and cognitive bias modification. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have been also extensively studied and shown to be effective in SAD. Two alternative strategies have been developed to treat SAD with disappointing results: cognitive bias modification, and pharmacological augmentation of psychotherapy using D-cycloserine during exposure sessions. Expert opinion: Personalized treatments for SAD patients are now available. Innovative strategies such as online psychotherapy and virtual reality exposure are usefu...
Source: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Tags: Expert Rev Neurother Source Type: research

Related Links:

Psychother Psychosom
Source: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Conclusions: The findings from this exploratory study are consistent with the possibility that dialogue therapy may lead to improvements in symptoms and functioning compared to standard treatment in psychosis. Introduction Standard treatment (ST) for psychosis consists primarily of antipsychotics, hospitalization, social rehabilitation, and different types of supportive therapy (1–3). Antipsychotic drugs have only moderate effects on positive symptoms and no demonstrable effects on negative symptoms (4–6). Side effects are often prominent and might include a reduction in emotional expression, menstrual ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Compared with waiting list, guided iCBT is effective and likely results in symptom improvement in mild to moderate major depression and social phobia. Guided iCBT may improve the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder compared with waiting list. However, we are uncertain about the effectiveness of iCBT compared with individual or group face-to-face CBT. Guided iCBT represents good value for money and could be offered for the short-term treatment of adults with mild to moderate major depression or anxiety disorders. Most people with mild to moderate depression or anxiety disorders with whom...
Source: Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series - Category: General Medicine Tags: Ont Health Technol Assess Ser Source Type: research
For something so common, anxiety is still massively misunderstood. There are myths and misconceptions about everything from what anxiety disorders look and feel like to what actually helps to treat these illnesses and navigate anxiety. Which is why we asked several anxiety experts to clear things up. Below, you’ll find their illuminating insights. Living with an anxiety disorder can be exceptionally difficult. Many people minimize and trivialize anxiety disorders. For instance, how often have you said or heard someone say “I’m sooo OCD about my desk!” or “I’m really OCD about using hand ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorder Treatment Anxiety Disorders Cbt exposure and response prevention therapy GAD Ocd Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Not only psychotherapy, but also medications and, to a lesser extent, placebo conditions have enduring effects. Long-lasting treatment effects observed in the follow-up period may be superimposed by effects of spontaneous remission or regression to the mean.Declaration of interestIn the past 12 months and in the near future, Dr Bandelow has been/will be on the speakers/advisory board for Hexal, Mundipharma, Lilly, Lundbeck, Pfizer and Servier. Dr Wedekind was on the speakers' board of AstraZeneca, Essex Pharma, Lundbeck and Servier. All other authors have nothing to declare. PMID: 29706139 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Psychiatry for Mental Science - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Br J Psychiatry Source Type: research
tos D Abstract Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and colitis ulcerosa) is a chronic, long-term condition that causes chronic inflammation in the digestive tract, and shows an increasing incidence and prevalence worldwide. Changes in disease activity over time affect psychological distress which increases the risk of exacerbations. Beside somatic symptoms (such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea and weight loss), psychiatric comorbidity (in particular major depression, anxiety, social phobia) is common in patients with Crohn's disease. This case study illustrates the management and stabilization of a 21-year-ol...
Source: Orvosi Hetilap - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Orv Hetil Source Type: research
Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with considerable individual suffering and societal costs. Although there is ample evidence for the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy, recent studies suggest psychodynamic therapy may also be effective in treating SAD. Furthermore, Internet-based psychodynamic therapy (IPDT) has shown promising results for addressing mixed depression and anxiety disorders. However, no study has yet investigated the effects of IPDT specifically for SAD. This paper describes a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a 10-week, affect-focused IPDT protocol for SAD, compared with a w...
Source: Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Whether you’ve been to therapy or not, you’ve probably heard about cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). It’s a popular type of therapy that many, many therapists use to help their clients treat everything from severe anxiety to debilitating depression. But even though CBT is widespread, it’s still highly misunderstood—even by the professionals who practice it. Numerous myths still abound. Below, two psychologists who specialize in CBT share the facts behind the most common misconceptions. Myth: CBT is a rigid, one-size-fits-all approach where a clinician applies a specific technique to a specif...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Cbt CBT myths CBT psychologist Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Depression distorted thoughts Mood Disorders Negative Thoughts Source Type: news
This study examined change in negative cognitive and negative metacognitive beliefs as independent correlates of symptom improvement in 46 SAD patients undergoing evidence-based treatments. Both types of beliefs decreased during treatment. However, change in metacognitive belief was the only consistent independent predictor across all outcomes and change in cognitive beliefs did not significantly predict outcomes when change in self-consciousness was controlled. The implication of this finding is that metacognitive change might be more important than cognitive belief change in symptom outcome and recovery in SAD. KEY P...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
Conclusion Worry is a normal phenomenon that affects us all. Worry can be adaptive in situations where there is a real possibility of injury or death, but in the majority of instances, is not a successful strategy to deal with the vicissitudes of life.  Research shows that when worry becomes severe and excessive, individuals are at risk of developing generalized anxiety disorder; a condition involving chronic worry, muscles tension, and irritability. Individuals with this disorder may worry for a variety of reasons, such as to avoid mental imagery of disastrous outcomes, to tolerate ambiguity and uncertainty, to avoid...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Neuroscience Stress chronic worry Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Generalized Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Rumination Social Anxiety Disorder Source Type: news
More News: Anxiety | Brain | Cognitive Behavior Therapy | Internet | Neurology | Psychotherapy | Social Anxiety Disorder