Menopausal Hormone Therapy and breast cancer: need to put risks in perspective

Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is the treatment of choice for menopausal symptoms and urogenital atrophy. Furthermore, it has beneficial effects on chronic diseases related to estrogen deficiency, such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease [1 –4]. Women worldwide have been using MHT to alleviate their symptoms for decades. However, fear of breast cancer, hinders menopausal women from seeking medical advice and renders clinicians reluctant to prescribe MHT.
Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research

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ConclusionsThe natural, age-related reduction in bone density is exacerbated by breast cancer active AI treatment. Future research should focus on investigating screening adherence-related barriers/facilitators and effective strategies to bring practice in line with agreed standards.
Source: Osteoporosis International - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Choice of SERM, selection of doses, and clinical trial data evaluating safety and efficacy are key to ensuring safety and adequate therapeutic effect of TSECs for addressing menopausal symptoms.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Clinical Corner: Invited Review Source Type: research
Abstract Transition to menopause is associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, mainly attributed to lipid and glucose metabolism dysregulation, as well as to body fat redistribution, leading to abdominal obesity. Indeed, epidemiological evidence suggests that both early menopause (EM, defined as age at menopause
Source: Current Vascular Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Vasc Pharmacol Source Type: research
In conclusion, progesterone effectively treats VMS, improves sleep and may be the only therapy that symptomatic women, who are menopausal at a normal age and without osteoporosis, need. PMID: 29962247 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Climacteric - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Climacteric Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Currently, there is insufficient high-quality evidence to inform women considering HRT after treatment for endometrial cancer. The available evidence (both the single RCT and non-randomised evidence) does not suggest significant harm, if HRT is used after surgical treatment for early-stage endometrial cancer. There is no information available regarding use of HRT in higher-stage endometrial cancer (FIGO stage II and above). The use of HRT after endometrial cancer treatment should be individualised, taking account of the woman's symptoms and preferences, and the uncertainty of evidence for and against HRT use. ...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
AbstractMenopause predisposes women to osteoporosis due to declining estrogen levels. This results in a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) and an increase in fractures. Osteoporotic fractures lead to substantial morbidity and mortality, and are considered one of the largest public health priorities by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is therefore essential for menopausal women to receive appropriate guidance for the prevention and management of osteoporosis. The Women ’s Health Initiative (WHI) randomized controlled trial first proved hormonal therapy (HT) reduces the incidence of all osteoporosis-related ...
Source: Osteoporosis International - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other when it comes to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat symptoms of menopause. At first, the replacement hormones—mostly a combination of estrogen and progestin to replace what the body stops making after menopause—were seen as a panacea. Doctors thought they could not only relieve hot flashes and night sweats, but also prevent chronic aging diseases like heart problems and weakening bones. But studies then found that the supplement hormones could lead to a higher risk of breast cancer—and that they didn’t protect the heart after all. In the l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs estrogen Hormone Therapy hormones for menopause hot flashes night sweats progestin Reproductive Health treating menopause Source Type: news
Conclusions: In this cohort of women with elevated risk, high serum 25(OH)D levels and regular vitamin D supplement use were associated with lower rates of incident, postmenopausal breast cancer over 5 y of follow-up. These results may help to establish clinical benchmarks for 25(OH)D levels; in addition, they support the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation is useful in breast cancer prevention. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP943 About This Article Received: 09 August 2016 Revised: 23 January 2017 Accepted: 06 February 2017 Published: 06 July 2017 Address correspondence to C. R. Weinberg, 111 TW Alexander Dr., Rese...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
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