Non-prescription cannabis use for symptom management amongst women with gynecologic malignancies

ConclusionsWomen with gynecologic cancer report a strong interest in the use of non-prescription cannabis products for management of cancer-related symptoms. Practitioners in the field of gynecologic oncology should be aware of the frequency of use of non-prescription cannabis amongst their patients as well as the growing desire for guidance about the use of cannabis derivatives. A substantial number of patients report decreased reliance on opioids when using cannabis derivatives for pain control.
Source: Gynecologic Oncology Reports - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

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Conclusion.Symptom expression is amplified in patients with delirium, whereas patients without delirium may be more responsive to palliative treatments with a significant decrease in intensity of ESAS items.Implications for Practice.Symptom expression is amplified in patients with cancer who have delirium, whereas patients without delirium may be more responsive to palliative treatments with a significant decrease in symptom intensity.
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Symptom Management and Supportive Care Source Type: research
“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In a blog post last week, I shared an excerpt from the new book that Paul Cerrato and I just completed,The Transformative Power of Mobile Medicine. Here is a second excerpt from Chapter 3,  “Exploring the Strengths and Weaknesses of Mobile Health Apps.”Even patients who are fully engaged in their own care still need access to medical apps they can trust. The IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science has performed a detailed analysis of the clinical evidence supporting mobile health apps, rating their maturity and relative quality. Its rating scale places a single observational study near the bottom of th...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Knowledge obtained from this study could be beneficial for better understanding, assessment, and management of symptom clusters in women with BC. It may also help patients to plan ahead for them to seek management of concurrent symptoms to improve their quality of life.
Source: Indian Journal of Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, Volume 21Author(s): Neil Browne, Philippa Bush, Fernando CaboAbstractIntroductionThe study investigated the effectiveness of Shiatsu therapy in relation to the management of health and wellbeing concerns of cancer and palliative care patients in an out-patient clinic.MethodPatients are referred to the Complementary Therapies Service for symptom management, particularly stress and anxiety, but also other symptoms such as nausea or insomnia. Data was collected following use of the Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCaW) questionnaire, whic...
Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion Anxiety, stress management and pain scores were the most improved. Wellbeing scores also improved, on average, by two points on the Likert scale. Patients have stated that ‘being listened to’ and ‘being heard’ were important factors when describing how Shiatsu had helped. We suggest that a study using larger numbers is necessary in order to provide more robust evidence rather than emerging trends.
Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) is a safe modulation of brain activity for treating depression, anxiety, insomnia, and pain. However, there are no published studies in patients with advanced cancer (ACP).
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion. A review of the literature suggests that there are adequate data supporting the efficacy and general safety of the low-dose use of trazodone for the treatment of insomnia. keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(9–10):24–34 Introduction Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking too early1 and is associated with significant impairments in daytime activities, which might occur despite adequate opportunities for sleep.2–6 Primary insom...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review hypnotics insomnia sedative trazodone treatment Source Type: research
I might have mentioned before that I have problems sleeping. This isn't new. I have had problems sleeping since my 30s. But its only recently that it has gotten much more complicated than just a bit of insomnia. Add in things like:Back pain so it can be really hard to get comfortable to sleep at all.Fibromyalgia which causes both fatigue and insomniaRheumatoid painSleep apnea and an evil CPAP machine which keeps me awakeShould I go on? I can....In the past, I have been known to get up and wash the dishes and clean the kitchen in the middle of the night because I couldn't sleep. Trust me, I have been all over the house doin...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: lack of sleep Source Type: blogs
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