Thalidomide - The Real Story & The First Seal Baby By James Linder Jones, M.D., M.H.A., FACEP

http://www.healthworldnet.com/articles/the-best-of-the-best/the-first-seal-baby-the-real-story-of-thalidomide.htmlThalidomide, despite its sordid past is undergoing a sort of renaissance and is being manufactured and used worldwide for a variety of illnesses including leprosyThe Thalidomide story had a complex course, full of unintended discoveries, with unforeseen consequences including the elements of an adventure story; heroes and heroines, bad guys, villains, intrigue, deception, antagonists and protagonists, even Nazis.It was December 25, 1956. In Stollberg, Germany. A young, nervous, to-be Dad was waiting for news from the delivery room. His wife was giving birth. He worked as a chemist for the German pharmacy company Grunenthal. Later, the doctor gave him disturbing news; his child had no arms, and only vestigial flipper-like hands, a condition known as phocomelia, Greek for seal arms.No one could know that in reality the world had received its first Thalidomide baby. The chemist had been given some samples of his company’s new wonder drug for nausea, especially nausea of pregnancy. Later he would learn that only one such baby had been born in Germany with phocomelia within the last twenty years, and that it was thought to be rare birth defect that ran in families. This is where most narratives of Thalidomide usually start.But the story began much sooner; in the 1930’s. Persistent investigations by independent investigators and representatives of the England-b...
Source: PharmaGossip - Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: Source Type: blogs