Resurgence of Vaccine-Preventable Disease: Ethics in the Pediatric Emergency Department

After a decades-long reduction in vaccine-preventable illnesses worldwide, there has been a reappearance of childhood illnesses once thought to be eradicated. This resurgence in illnesses such as polio and measles is a consequence of multifactorial events leading to decreased vaccination rates. A lack of resources in poor and war-torn countries, coupled with increasing global travel, and decisions to delay or defer vaccinations because of inaccurate studies further emphasized by media have combined to result in current state of frequent local and widespread epidemics, specifically the current outbreak of measles. As providers in the pediatric emergency department, we are often the first to encounter children manifesting these diseases. It is imperative that we understand the circumstances leading to these encounters, so that we can have engaged conversations with families, gain an understanding of their motivations, dispel any misinformed beliefs, and encourage positive health behaviors for their children.
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease viruses Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized History onetime Source Type: news
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Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
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Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Middle East & North Africa Famine OCHA Saudi Arabia Yemen Source Type: news
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Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: The Lancet Global Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
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