Cannabinoids and Pain Management: an Insight into Recent Advancements

AbstractPurpose of ReviewThis review discusses the recent advancements in research on Cannabinoids ’ role in pain, including its use in cancer pain, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, headache, visceral pain, postoperative and failed back pain management, and concurrent use with opioids.Recent FindingsCurrent research suggests that a potential role exists for medical cannabis in pain management, although research shows varied effectiveness by the type of pain. Moreover, its coadministration with opioids may result in reduced opioid requirements.SummaryPatients with neuropathic pain, cancer pain, and migraine headache may benefit from the analgesic effects of a cannabis-based medicine (CBM), but not necessarily patients with chronic abdominal pain. Equivocal results were shown in fibromyalgia and postoperative orthopedic pain. Interestingly, the opioid-sparing properties of CBM make it an attractive option for pain management. However, the scale and quality of studies conducted are limited. Further research is necessary to establish recommendation guidelines for medical cannabis in pain management.
Source: Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

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by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioid pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs
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Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Narrative Review Source Type: research
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Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Orthopedic Surgery Pain Management Source Type: blogs
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Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Therapeutic approaches Research Pain conditions Coping strategies Science in practice Health healthcare biopsychosocial pain management Source Type: blogs
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Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Health Research biopsychosocial healthcare Source Type: blogs
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Aging Choice gender Women's Health Flibanserin Food and Drug Administration Sexual desire Sexual dysfunction Source Type: blogs
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Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain management Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 27 April 2015 Source:The Lancet, Volume 385, Supplement 2 Author(s): Tracy Jackson , Sarah Thomas , Victoria Stabile , Xue Han , Matthew Shotwell , Kelly McQueen Background The global burden of chronic pain and disability could be related to unmet surgical needs. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to characterise existing data regarding the prevalence and associations of chronic pain in low-income and middle-income countries; this is essential to allow better assessment of its relationship to pre-operative and post-operative pain as emergency and essential surgical services are expanded. Met...
Source: The Lancet - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
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