Hypothyroidism in Context: Where We ’ve Been and Where We’re Going

AbstractHypothyroidism affects up to 5% of the general population, with a further estimated 5% being undiagnosed. Over 99% of affected patients suffer from primary hypothyroidism. Worldwide, environmental iodine deficiency is the most common cause of all thyroid disorders, including hypothyroidism, but in areas of iodine sufficiency, Hashimoto ’s disease (chronic autoimmune thyroiditis) is the most common cause of thyroid failure. Hypothyroidism is diagnosed biochemically, being overt primary hypothyroidism defined as serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations above and thyroxine concentrations below the normal reference ran ge. Symptoms of hypothyroidism are non-specific and include mild to moderate weight gain, fatigue, poor concentration, depression, and menstrual irregularities, while the consequences of untreated or under-treated hypothyroidism include cardiovascular disease and increased mortality. Levothyroxine h as long been the main tool for treating hypothyroidism and is one of the world’s most widely prescribed medicines. In adults with overt hypothyroidism, levothyroxine is usually prescribed at a starting dose of 1.6 µg/kg/day, which is then titrated to achieve optimal TSH levels (0.4–4.0 mIU/L), according to the therapeutic target. We here summarise the history of levothyroxine and discuss future issues regarding the optimal treatment of hypothyroidism. Because nearly one-third of patients with treated hypothyroidism stil...
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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This study raises the possibility of a role for surgery for patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis who continue to feel poorly despite optimal treatment with thyroid hormone. However, the study, while well done, is a relatively small one. We need longer-term follow up and confirmation with additional studies done on diverse populations. It’s also important to consider that thyroid surgery in patients with advanced Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is difficult. Rates of complications, including injury to the laryngeal nerve (which controls voice) and the parathyroid glands (which maintain normal blood calcium levels...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Thyroid Disorders Source Type: blogs
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Marco Vacante1, Antonio Biondi1, Francesco Basile1, Roberto Ciuni1, Salvatore Luca1, Salomone Di Saverio2, Carola Buscemi3, Enzo Saretto Dante Vicari3 and Antonio Maria Borzì3* 1Department of General Surgery and Medical-Surgical Specialties, University of Catania, Catania, Italy 2Cambridge Colorectal Unit, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Specialization School in Geriatrics, University of Catania, Catania, Italy There is a high prevalence of hypothyroidism in the elderly population, mainly among women. The mo...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Similar to the gas pedal in your car, the thyroid controls the “speed” of your metabolism. It fine-tunes the function of virtually every tissue in the body, from the lowly cells responsible for creating fingernails to the nerve cells in the brain that guide memory and thought. Your thyroid hormone level has to be just right. Too high and you are anxious and lose weight despite eating like a horse. Too low and no matter how meticulous your diet or how many calories you cut back, you fail to lose weight or gain weight. Just right and your efforts are rewarded by natural weight loss when nutrition is managed prope...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Thyroid disease Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle energy fatigue healthcare insomnia Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
A while ago, I wrote to you about thyroid function and the role it plays in managing your metabolism. This is so important that I wanted to mention it again. If you are taking the proper steps, and have removed all of the toxic grains from your diet, but still aren’t losing the weight you desire, maybe you should consider having your thyroid checked.   Is your little thyroid sensitive? The thyroid gland sits on the front of your throat like a miniature bow-tie. Of all endocrine glands, the thyroid gland is the most susceptible to autoimmune damage. When the immune system is unable to distinguish proteins i...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Dr. Davis News & Updates Thyroid disease Weight loss Wheat allergy Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar diabetes grains Wheat Belly Total Health Source Type: blogs
By: Dr. Alan Christianson When someone you know is living with hypothyroidism, it can be tempting to think that if only the doctor would prescribe an extra helping of thyroid hormone, your friend or loved one would feel so much better and would enjoy life more. And in some cases, an extra helping might be in order. In other cases, not so much. Too much thyroid hormone can actually be dangerous, which is why doctors are loathe to bump the levothyroxin dosage up an extra 25 micrograms or so for one of their patients who's still experiencing hypothyroid symptoms. Tests always come first, and there's a good reason for that....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Rebecca shared her photos and experience living the Wheat Belly lifestyle: “Eliminating wheat has made such a huge difference in my health and, surprisingly, my appearance. I am 42 and have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. I’m also a single mom of four and was told that it was ‘normal’ for me to be tired. But I was miserable. I was so tired it hurt despite having thyroid levels that were in the normal range. I also had brain ‘fog,’ anxiety, depression, and trouble sleeping. Doctor after doctor kept prescribing me more medicine: medicine for my mood, medicine to help me sleep. And despite a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories anti-aging anxiety Armour autoimmune Depression hashimoto's hypothyroid Inflammation insomnia leaky gut sleep Weight Loss youth Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe obtained results suggest that both thyroid autoimmunity and mild thyroid failure, particularly if they occur together, may negatively affect female sexual function and depressive symptoms.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Clinical Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Dawn shared her thyroid experience that provides a wonderful encapsulation of many of the issues we encounter when we try to get thyroid health re-established: I had a TSH of 3.9 for years, and they ALL said my thyroid was fine, then tried to give me antidepressants and told me to exercise more and sleep better. It made me so mad, because I knew I wasn’t depressed and I was exercising. I finally found a functional doctor who tested all of them. Not only did my free T3 and T4 prove that I was indeed hypothyroid, but my antibodies showed I also had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Hmmm, imagine that: I wasn’t depr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmunity endocrine disruption grains Hashimoto's thyroiditis hypothyroiditism iodine Source Type: blogs
If your heart starts pounding and skipping beats what is your first thought? For Mary M., 49, it was, “Oh No! Is this a heart attack? Is it heart arrhythmia? I know my mother has an irregular heartbeat and my grandmother died from a stroke.  Is it my turn?” So, off she went to the doctor. Her pounding heart had been waking her up at night and she was ready for the diagnosis and sat pretty calmly through the EKG test. Her mother took heart medication, exercised and watched her diet so she knew how to handle it. When the doctor returned to the room and told her “Your heart looks fine and your heart rat...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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