Sleep disorders and their treatment in post-traumatic stress disorder.

[Sleep disorders and their treatment in post-traumatic stress disorder]. Presse Med. 2019 Aug 28;: Authors: Mascarel P, Poirot I, Lardinois M, Debien C, Vaiva G Abstract Subjects suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder present sleeping disorders like a chronic insomnia, traumatic nightmares, but also less expected, sleep breathing disorders. Sleep problems are a factor of development and maintenance of PTSD, but also a factor of resistance to treatment. After a therapy focused on PTSD, they represent frequent residual symptoms. It is necessary to couple, with the usual management of PTSD, targeted approaches for sleep problems. These targeted approaches allow an improvement of the nocturnal properties but also diurnal specific symptoms of PTSD. Stakes around primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of PTSD emerge around these sleep disorders. PMID: 31473024 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research

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rno R Abstract While evidence-based interventions can help the substantial number of veterans diagnosed with comorbid PTSD and depression, an emerging literature has identified sleep disturbances as predictors of treatment nonresponse. More specifically, predicting effects of residual insomnia and nightmares on postintervention PTSD and depressive symptoms among veterans with comorbid PTSD and depression has remained unclear. The present study used data from a clinical trial of Behavioral Activation and Therapeutic Exposure (BA-TE), a combined approach to address comorbid PTSD and depression, administered to veter...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
In conclusion, this review highlights the importance for clinicians to investigate for the presence of chronic nightmares along with other sleep difficulties (most commonly, insomnia and sleep apnea), to consider the potential influence of nightmares on the course of the primary mental disorder, and to be prepared to grant access to treatments targeting nightmares. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
Source: Dreaming - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Conclusions:Combining IR with CBT-I conferred no advantage overall. Further research is essential to examine the possibly greater benefit of adding IR to CBT-I for some subgroups of veterans with PTSD.Clinical Trial Registration:Registry: ClinicalTrials.gov; Title: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Nightmares in Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans; Identifier: NCT00691626; URL:https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00691626Citation:Harb GC, Cook JM, Phelps AJ, Gehrman PR, Forbes D, Localio R, Harpaz-Rotem I, Gur RC, Ross RJ. Randomized controlled trial of imagery rehearsal for posttra...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
Jinme Park1, Thomas Elbert1*, Seog Ju Kim2 and Jinah Park31Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany2Department of Psychiatry, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea3Department of Counseling, Kyonggy University, Suwon, South KoreaRefugees are exposed to multiple traumatic and stressful events and thereby are at higher risk for developing a variety of psychological sequelae including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the relation of PTSD to other mental health conditions has not been fully revealed in refugee populations. The present stud...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
AbstractPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent, debilitating disorder found to develop after exposure to a potentially traumatic event (PTE). Individuals with PTSD often report sleep disturbances, specifically nightmares and insomnia, which are listed within the criteria for PTSD. This research examined prevalence of insomnia and nightmares within a national sample of 2,647 adults (data weighted by age and sex to correct for differences in sample distribution) who had been exposed to one or more PTEs. Prevalence of self ‐reported sleep disturbance, sleep disturbances by PTE type, and gender difference...
Source: Journal of Traumatic Stress - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
“To die, to sleep — perchance to dream — ay, there’s the rub, for in this sleep of death what dreams may come…” – William Shakespeare, Hamlet Everyone requires sleep in order to function properly. Sleep is known to aid in healing, in memory formation, reducing stress, eliminating toxins – literally wiping the slate clean of the day’s experiences to begin anew. The subject of decades of research, sleep science continues to amass evidence of new health benefits from sleep. A Single Gene Ties Sleep to Immunity A newly discovered single gene, called nemuri, increase...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Agitation Anger Memory and Perception Psychology Research Sleep Anger Management Circadian Rhythm Immune Function Insomnia nemuri nightmare disorder Nightmares Sleep Apnea Sleep Disorder sleep quality Source Type: blogs
AbstractPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent, debilitating disorder found to develop after exposure to a potentially traumatic event (PTE). Individuals with PTSD often report sleep disturbances, specifically nightmares and insomnia, which are listed within the criteria for PTSD. This research examined prevalence of insomnia and nightmares within a national sample of 2,647 adults (data weighted by age and sex to correct for differences in sample distribution) who had been exposed to one or more PTEs. Prevalence of self ‐reported sleep disturbance, sleep disturbances by PTE type, and gender difference...
Source: Journal of Traumatic Stress - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewPost-traumatic nightmares (PTN) are a common and enduring problem for individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other clinical presentations. PTN cause significant distress, are associated with large costs, and are an independent risk factor for suicide. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for PTN exist. A previous review in this journal demonstrated that Prazosin, an alpha blocker, was a preferred pharmacological treatment for PTN and imagery rescripting therapy (IRT) was a preferred non-pharmacological treatment. Since that time, new and important research f...
Source: Current Psychiatry Reports - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions:Fear of sleep was related to sleep disturbances specific to trauma rather than“classic” insomnia symptoms. Unexpectedly, greater fear of sleep was associated with reduced WASO. These results may be related to having a truncated sleep period and thus more consolidated sleep. Fear of sleep deceased following CBT-I despite not being a permissible target for this research protocol and not being related to insomnia symptoms.Clinical Trial Registration:Registry: CinicalTrials.gov; Name: Treating People with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia; Identifier: NCT00881...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
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