Patient and public beliefs about the role of imaging in the management of non-specific low back pain: A scoping review

Routine imaging for non-specific low back pain is advised against in guidelines yet imaging continues to occur. Patient and public beliefs regarding imaging may be a driving factor contributing to this.
Source: Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Source Type: research

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ConclusionsWhile the SOLAS intervention and trial procedures were acceptable to participants and PTs, the recruitment of enough participants is the biggest obstacle to a definitive trial.Trial registrationISRCTNISRCTN49875385. Registered on 26 March 2014.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conclusion. First and last year physical therapy students did not present a difference between biomedical and biopsychosocial beliefs. Although biomedical beliefs were prevalent in both groups, the academics of the last year who had low back pain presented lower levels of biomedical beliefs than the academics of the last year without low back symptoms. Level of Evidence: 4
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: EPIDEMIOLOGY Source Type: research
Alert: rant ahead. Early in my career working in persistent pain management, it was thought that “chronic pain is chronic pain is chronic pain” and pretty much anything that helped one person would help the next. Over time we’ve learned a lot more about persistent pain: the mechanisms differ a lot between neuropathic mechanisms and nociplastic mechanisms. Even within these groups, the mechanisms are very different. We’ve also learned a lot more about the psychosocial variables that are associated with prolonged disability and distress when pain persists. Some of the earliest work by Turk and coll...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Groupwork Interdisciplinary teams Pain conditions Research Science in practice Source Type: blogs
We thank the authors of this letter for their interest in our review of patient and public beliefs about imaging for low back pain (LBP).
Source: Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We read the article by Taylor and Bishop, “Patient and public beliefs about the role of imaging in the management of non-specific low back pain: a scoping review” [1]. This review determined that although sparse, evidence suggests patients perceive imaging for low back pain (LBP) as positive, and a patient’s desire for a definitive di agnosis for their pains is the driver of this.
Source: Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Chronic/persistent pain management is not sexy. No-one gets a magic cure. Lives are not saved – at least not in a way that mortality statistics show. Chronic pain management is under-funded. And now: buried in a list of other proposed service cuts in the local health board’s plan to save millions of dollars, is a proposal to “save” $650,000 from the pain clinic. You’ll note also reductions in community services, GP support for vulnerable, and healthy lifestyles programmes. https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/122558278/hundreds-of-staff-nurses-and-services-may-be-axed-at-canterbury-d...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Interdisciplinary teams News Pain conditions Research Science in practice Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
A couple of weeks back I posted about my concerns that exercise is often over-hyped, has limited effects on pain and disability, and therefore people going through a rehabilitation programme will likely dump doing the exercises as soon as the programme ends. Well, that was an interesting conversation starter! TBH I expected the response. On the one hand we have avid strength and conditioning people (including a whole bunch of physiotherapists) saying it’s crucial to get strong and fit because it’s good for health and longevity, while on the other hand we have a large group of “others” who think life...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice goal setting Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 21 July 2020Source: Journal of PhysiotherapyAuthor(s): Tarcisio F de Campos, Natasha C Pocovi, Chris G Maher, Helen A Clare, Tatiane M da Silva, Mark J Hancock
Source: Journal of Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The evidence from this systematic review is uncertain regarding the effect of therapeutic ultrasound on pain in individuals with chronic non-specific LBP. Whilst there is some evidence that therapeutic ultrasound may have a small effect on improving low back function in the short term compared to placebo, the certainty of evidence is very low. The true effect is likely to be substantially different. There are few high-quality randomised trials, and the available trials were very small. The current evidence does not support the use of therapeutic ultrasound in the management of chronic LBP. PMID: 32623724 ...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundMovement and posture are commonly believed to relate to non ‐specific low back pain (NSLBP). While people with NSLBP appear to move and posture themselves differently from those without NSLBP, changes in movement and posture infrequently relate to improvements in NSLBP when analysed at a group‐level. Additionally, little is known about how movement or po sture change when clinical outcome improves.MethodsWithin ‐person relationships were investigated using a replicated, repeated measures, single‐case design in 12 people with persistent, disabling NSLBP. Individually relevant movement and posture w...
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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