Abdominal Pain After a Tick Bite

Dr. Derek Monette: Today's case is that of a 46-year-old male with recent diagnoses of Lyme disease and babesiosis who presented to our emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. The patient was previously healthy and had been well until approximately 2  weeks before the day of ED presentation, when he developed headache, fatigue, and myalgias. He also noticed that his right calf “looks sunburned,” and was warm to the touch. He was evaluated by his primary care physician (PCP) after 1 week of symptoms.
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Case Presentations of the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residencies Source Type: research

Related Links:

Is erector spinae plane block an effective strategy to improve postsurgical analgesia?BMC Anesthesiology
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news
(CNN) — After more than three months of shutdowns, mandatory quarantines, self-imposed exile from society and working from home, nature-lovers looking for a well-earned breath of fresh air could face a possible collision course between coronavirus and tick-borne illnesses this summer. A “perfect storm,” warns Eva Sapi, a University of New Haven biology professor and group director for the Lyme Disease Research Group. Noting the mild winter on the East Coast, Sapi says, “We do have a bad year for the ticks.” Hikers, campers and anyone else eager for an escape could “just explode into...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN LYME DISEASE tick season ticks Source Type: news
Source: Journal of Pain Research - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Journal of Pain Research Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Pain Research - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Journal of Pain Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 July 2020Source: The Veterinary JournalAuthor(s): A.L. Hatke, D.R. Green, K. Stasiak, R.T. Marconi
Source: The Veterinary Journal - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
JULIE COOK: The pain radiating from my abdomen was worse than childbirth. It began on Christmas Eve. I was at home with our children while my husband - a musician - was at work.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine if the timing of administration of systemic enzyme therapy [SET] has any effect on its efficacy in controlling postoperative sequelae of third molar surgery.Study designA double blinded prospective randomized control trial was planned. The sample included patients requiring impacted mandibular third molar surgical extraction. Patients were randomly allocated to four groups (50 patients per group). Group A included administration of SET 48 h prior to surgery; Group B, started on the day of surgery; Group C started immediately after surgery and control group D included ...
Source: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
“Doesn’t it typically happen during the summer?” asked a worried lady that had walked into my clinic in November with a growing circular rash on her wrist. She was referring, of course, to Lyme disease, that scourge of outdoor enthusiasts. While the peak season for Lyme disease is indeed summer, the ticks that transmit it are active March through December. And, while this may be off-season for the ticks, it is a good time to catch up on how to stay safe in the not-so-distant spring. What is Lyme disease, and how do you treat it? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi which is sp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Foresters and farmers are exposed to B. burgdorferi and A. phagocytophilum coinfection in the study area. Therefore, it is probable that these pathogens may severely interfere with the clinical course of Lyme borreliosis. PMID: 28035112 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Vector Borne Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: J Vector Borne Dis Source Type: research
More News: Babesiosis | Emergency Medicine | Harvard | Headache | Lyme Disease | Migraine | Pain | Primary Care | Residencies