Postoperative management of weight bearing and rehabilitation after lumbar spinal surgery.

DISCUSSION: Due to the heterogeneity of the intensity, duration and form of physiotherapy or rehabilitation, which are listed as interventions in the various studies, it is only possible to draw limited conclusions about general instructions for action on "physiotherapy" after spinal surgery. PMID: 31463542 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Orthopade - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Orthopade Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Both microdecompression and wide open laminectomy with posterior stabilization were effective in treatment of multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis with superior results of microdecompression regarding less back pain postoperatively with less blood loss and soft tissue dissection. Clinical trial number: NCT04087694. PMID: 31827656 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Pain Research and Management - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Pain Res Manag Source Type: research
ConclusionsSeveral shared and unique barriers and facilitators to using the stratified care approaches for non-specific LBP among Canadian physiotherapists and chiropractors were identified. Findings may help inform the design of tailored theory-based knowledge translation interventions to increase the uptake of stratified care approaches in clinical practice.
Source: Chiropractic and Manual Therapies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract The prolonged disability associated with musculoskeletal (MSK) pain represents an enormous health burden, for individuals as well as society. Promoting pain and disability management for patients with persistent MSK-related conditions can be very challenging for rehabilitation professionals. These often-complex conditions require the adoption of a biopsychosocial perspective in order to assess and address a vast array of potential factors affecting the patient. Fortunately, a self-management (SM) approach has been deemed effective in enhancing patients' control over their symptoms and disabilities. Howeve...
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research
Once you begin to dip your toes into psychological therapies, it doesn’t take long before you begin to see TLAs all over the place. So today I’m going to post on two things: some of the TLAs, and why or how we might consider using these approaches in pain rehabilitation. The first one is CBT, or cognitive behavioural therapy. CBT grew out of two movements: behaviour therapy (Skinner and the pigeons, rats and all that behaviour modification stuff), and cognitive therapy (Ellis and Beck and the “cognitive triad” – more on this later). When the two approaches to therapy are combined, we have c...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Clinical reasoning Cognitive behavioral therapy Coping strategies Interdisciplinary teams Occupational therapy Physiotherapy Professional topics Psychology Research Science in practice Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: We found moderate- to low-quality evidence that exercise programmes probably slightly improve function, may reduce pain, and probably slightly reduce global patient assessment of disease activity, when compared with no intervention, and measured upon completion of the programme. We found moderate- to low-quality evidence that exercise programmes probably have little or no effect on improving function or reducing pain, when compared with usual care, and may have little or no effect on reducing patient assessment of disease activity, when measured upon completion of the programmes. We are uncertain whether exerc...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Today’s post is another one where there’s very little to guide my thinking… Have you ever wondered why we read so much research looking at the characteristics of the people who look for help with their pain – yet not nearly as much about us, the people who do the helping? There are studies about us – thanks Ben – and others! (Darlow, Dowell, Baxter, Mathieson, Perr &Dean, 2013; Farin, Gramm &Schmidt, 2013; Parsons, Harding, Breen, Foster, Pincus, Vogel &Underwood, 2007). We know some things are helpful for people with pain: things like listening capabilities (Matthias, Ba...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice attitudes beliefs communication nocebo Source Type: blogs
Routine imaging for non-specific low back pain is advised against in guidelines yet imaging continues to occur. Patient and public beliefs regarding imaging may be a driving factor contributing to this.
Source: Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Pain education in combination with exercise therapy was effective for improving pain and function in a full-thickness tear of Supraspinatus and Infraspinatus tendon in a patient also suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. PMID: 31356189 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil Source Type: research
ConclusionAvailable data suggest that the information needs of people with low back pain are centred around their desire for a diagnosis, potentially contributing to expectations for and overuse of imaging. People with low back pain expressed a strong desire for clear, consistent and personalised information on prognosis, treatment options and self-management strategies, related to healthcare and occupational issues. To correct unhelpful beliefs and optimise delivery of evidence-based therapy, patient and healthcare professional education (potentially by an integrated public health approach) may be warranted.
Source: Journal of Physiotherapy - Category: Physiotherapy Source Type: research
This is a long…… readooops, sorry, not. Low back pain is, we know, the greatest contributor to days lived with disability (Rice, Smith &Blyth, 2016). And no-one anywhere in the world has found a good mix of services to reduce the number of days lived with disability as a result of this problem. And yet billions of dollars are used to fund research into the many contributors to a shift from acute low back pain to ongoing disability associated with low back pain. At the same time, treatments that directly target disability, rather than pain (a target considered the most important outcome by Sullivan a...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Low back pain Pain conditions Research Science in practice health funding health systems models of care Source Type: blogs
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