Antibiotics may help ease chronic back pain

Conclusion This well-designed double-blind RCT shows that the antibiotic treatment of chronic lower back pain caused by swelling of the spinal vertebrae is more effective than placebo at reducing back pain and disease-related disability The study had many strengths, including its randomised double-blind design, adequate sample size and one-year follow-up point. However, it did have some limitations, including the fact that: Patients varied at the start of the study. More people in the placebo group had lower grades of vertebrae change. This is hard to explain if allocation to the two groups had been completely concealed and fair, although it may have favoured improvements in the placebo group and therefore may not have influenced the results. Blinding of the participants may have been broken unintentionally. As this antibiotic caused such predictable bowel side effects in 65% of people taking the active treatment, it is possible that the participants knew they were taking an active treatment and therefore may have reported the subjective scores differently form the placebo group. The researchers did not report any testing for fidelity of the blinding, such as asking participants if they could guess which group they were in.  As strong as this research it is, it is not definitive. Further research, most likely with larger numbers of people in the study, will be needed to confirm these findings before any treatment is likely to be approved and licensed for routine...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Related Links:

Authors: Mazza E, Marcia S, Mondaini F, Piras E, Giordan N, Torri T, Barbanti-Bròdano G, Parodi F Abstract OBJECTIVE: In this premarket clinical study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of a novel Hydrogel (HYADD4-G) for reducing low back pain (LBP) in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-three patients with chronic LBP were enrolled. All patients presented with up to three lumbar black discs (Pfirrmann grade III or IV), LBP of at least 40 mm on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and a Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) score of at least 9. Patients rece...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Conclusions: The ability of SPECT-CT to precisely localize scintigraphically active FJs may provide significant improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with LBP. In this study we demonstrate that more tan 40% of FJs, the scintigraphic patterns on SPECT-CT did not correlate with the degree of degeneration on CT.
Source: Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Authors: Tags: Musculoskeletal Posters Source Type: research
Conclusion: Genetic associations of diseases considerably vary across populations which necessitates health-related genotyping efforts especially for so far understudied populations. SOM portrayal represents novel promising methods in population genetic research with special strength in visualization-based comparison of SNP data. Introduction Non-communicable polygenic diseases such as cancers, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders have become the most prevalent type worldwide and account for the majority of death events in developed and transition economy countries (Habib and Saha, 2010; Benzi...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
The objectives of this study were to define the role for surgery in the treatment of chronic low back pain (cLBP) and to develop a new classification of cLBP based on the pattern of injury.HypothesisSurgery may benefit patients with cLBP, and a new classification based on the injury pattern may be of interest.MethodA systematic literature review was performed by searching Medline, the Cochrane Library, the French public health database (Banque de Données en Santé Publique), Science Direct, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse. The main search terms were “back pain” OR “lumbar” OR &...
Source: Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Sickness absence mesmerizes many researchers, given the numerous publications on risk factors for sickness absence. A large variety of risk factors have been identified, including work-related risk factors such as physical work demands and psychosocial work factors (1,2), unhealthy behaviors such as lack pf physical activity and smoking (3,4), and chronic health problems (5). A logical next step seems to be the development of a prediction model, whereby an individual ’s profile on risk factors is converted into a probability on future sickness absence. In the past few years, several prediction models have been develo...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
If you are one of the more than 100 million Americans suffering with chronic pain, you know how desperate you can get searching for relief. For constant or chronic pain, sometimes knowing that you can only get temporary relief from medications sits at the back of your brain and sets up pain anticipation. Shouldn’t there be a better way, an approach or approaches that don’t rely on pharmaceutical drugs to combat pain? According to new research, there are some new pain relief methods that look very promising to do just that. Treatment from Strangers Mat Provide Unexpected Pain Relief It may seem counter-intuitiv...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Research Treatment Source Type: blogs
Meetings, meanderings, mind-expansions I’ve been away for abut 10 days, attending the World Congress of the International Association for the Study of Pain. It was a time of meetings with wonderful people I’ve met via the interwebs, with researchers and clinicians, and most importantly, with people living with pain. It was also a time for meanderings – around the very walkable city of Boston, embracing history and looking towards the future, and mind meanderings as well. And because it was a conference, it was also mind-expanding. New ideas, new ways of investigating this human experience of pain, ne...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Low back pain Chronic pain Research Occupational therapy Pain conditions Coping strategies Professional topics biopsychosocial pain management conference pain research Source Type: blogs
In this study, we analyzed FGF21 levels and alterations in the expression of genes encoding components of the FGF21-responsive molecular machinery in adipose tissue from aged individuals so as to ascertain whether altered FGF21 responsiveness that develops with aging jeopardizes human health and/or accelerates metabolic disturbances associated with aging. We studied a cohort of 28 healthy elderly individuals (≥70 years) with no overt signs of metabolic or other pathologies and compared them with a cohort of 35 young healthy controls (≤40 years). Serum FGF21 levels were significantly increased in elderly indiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Low back pain, despite the multitude of explanations and increasing disability associated with it, has been with humans since forever. Who knows why and I’m not about to conjecture. What’s interesting is that despite ergonomic solutions (fail), increased fitness amongst many people (also a fail), surgical solutions (fail), hands on solutions (fail, fail), and a whole bunch of “special” exercises (fail, fail, fail) we still don’t have a handle on how to reduce disability from it. I don’t think there will be many people who haven’t seen this: I’ve never quite worked out why, w...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Back pain Low back pain Pain conditions Research biopsychosocial Chronic pain Clinical reasoning disability pain management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
I recently submitted a manuscript to a journal. After the usual delay as the reviewers commented on my draft, I received the feedback – one comment stood out to me: “the references are quite old”. I scurried around to find some more recent references and resubmitted, but as I did, I started pondering this drive to continually draw on recent research even if the findings of the older references had not been superseded. There is a sense that maybe journal editors and perhaps people reading the journals think that old research has no merit. As someone who relishes reading about the history of pain and pain m...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Back pain Low back pain Professional topics history Source Type: blogs
More News: Amoxicillin | Augmentin | Back Pain | Chronic Pain | Disability | Health | Low Back Pain | Neurology | Neuroscience | Neurosurgery | Orthopaedics | Pain | PET Scan | Rheumatology | Science | Statistics | Study | Websites