Contemporary North-American population-based validation of the International Germ Cell Consensus Classification for metastatic germ cell tumors of the testis

AbstractBackgroundThe International Germ Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC) is the recommended stratification scheme for newly diagnosed metastatic seminoma (mSGCT) and non-seminoma germ cell tumor (mNSGCT) patients. However, a contemporary North-American population-based validation has never been completed and represented our focus.Materials and methodsWe identified mSGCT and mNSGCT patients within the SEER database (2004 –2015). The IGCCC criteria were used for stratification into prognostic groups. Kaplan–Meier (KM) derived actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were calculated. In addition, cumulative incidence plots tested cancer-specific (CSM) and other-cause mortality (OCM) rates.ResultsOf 321 mSGCT patients, 190 (59.2%) and 131 (40.8%), respectively, fulfilled good and intermediate prognosis criteria. Of 803 mNSGCT patients, 209 (26.1%), 100 (12.4%), and 494 (61.5%), respectively, fulfilled good, intermediate, and poor prognosis criteria. In mSGCT patients, actuarial KM derived 5-year OS was 87% and 78% for, respectively, good and intermediate prognosis groups (p = 0.02). In cumulative incidence analyses, statistically significant differences were recorded for CSM but not for OCM between good versus intermediate prognosis groups. In mNSGCT patients, actuarial KM derived 5-year OS was 89%, 75% and 60% for, respectively, good, intermediate, and poor progn osis groups (p 
Source: World Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Immune infiltrate/checkpoints associate with patients’ outcome, constituting novel (potentially targetable) disease biomarkers.
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
The azygos system is the most important pathway for decompression of the superior vena cava (SVC) when a blood flow obstruction to the right atrium is present. Thoracic and mediastinal malignancies, mainly lung cancers, are responsible for 60% –85% of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) cases. An uncommon origin of SVCS is primary malignant mediastinal germ cell tumor (PMMGCT) which represent 1%–4% of all mediastinal tumors and can be divided into two broad groups: seminomas and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). Primary medias tinal seminomas clinical presentation is often nonspecific, even if the major...
Source: Thoracic Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: CASE REPORT Source Type: research
Conclusions: The X chromosome inactivation event and demethylated XIST promoter are promising biomarkers for TGCTs and for assessing spermatogenesis quality.
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The differences in the expression of nucleolin between two groups of germ cell testicular tumors found in the current study indicate a new aspect of biology of these neoplasms and require further studies on the role of nucleolin in germ cell tumorigenesis. PMID: 31513277 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica - Category: Cytology Tags: Folia Histochem Cytobiol Source Type: research
Seminomas are the most frequent kind of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), accounting for 50% of tumor diagnosis in young men, whereas non-seminomas account for 40% and mixed forms for 10% of cases. It is currently supposed that TGCTs evolve from a pre-invasive stage of carcinoma in situ (CIS). Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) is essential for self-renewal of stem cells. It is considered as a major regulator of cell pluripotency. Prior studies have shown that seminoma expresses OCT4. Transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) has moreover associated with embryonic stem cell maintenance. Finally, ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ABSTRACT Testicular germ cell tumor is the most common cancer in 20-to 35-years-old men. There are known risk factors such as undescended testicle(s) and history of testicular cancer. Most lesions are germ cell tumors with two main subtypes: seminomas and non-seminomatous germ cell tumors.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
ABSTRACT Testicular germ cell tumor is the most common cancer in 20-to 35-years-old men. There are known risk factors such as undescended testicle(s) and history of testicular cancer. Most lesions are germ cell tumors with two main subtypes: seminomas and non-seminomatous germ cell tumors.
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is the first case of robot-assisted laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection with concomitant inferior vena cava thrombectomy and reconstruction for metastatic mixed testicular germ cell cancer published to date. This complicated surgical procedure was facilitated by the innovative usage of three-dimensional image reconstruction for defining the vena cava tumor thrombus, a robotic ultrasound probe for intraoperatively defining the vena cava tumor thrombus, and vena cavoscopy using a flexible ureteroscope.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionIn this analysis we were able to identify regions with significantly higher tumor incidence rates for both seminoma and non ‐seminoma which were specific for these two subtypes. Furthermore, trend analysis revealed a steady incidence rate for testicular cancer in Germany.
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Experience demonstrates multiple paths to cure for patients with clinical stage I testicular cancer. Because all options should provide a long-term disease-free rate near 100%, overall survival is no longer relevant in decision making, allowing practitioners to factor in quality of life, toxicity, cost, and impact on compliance. Surveillance for clinical stage I seminoma and clinical stage I nonseminoma has become the preferred option. The contrarian view is that a risk-adapted approach should persist, with surveillance for low-risk individuals and active therapy high-risk individuals. However, results ob...
Source: The Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urol Clin North Am Source Type: research
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