Health Tip: Understanding Measles

-- Measles is a contagious disease caused by a virus that is passed through the air and direct contact, says the World Health Organization. The first signs of measles are high fever, cough, red and watery eyes, and small white spots inside the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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The national immunisation programme is highly successful in reducing the incidence of serious and sometimes life-threatening diseases such as pneumococcal and meningococcal infections, whooping cough, diphtheria and measles. It remains important to maintain the best possible vaccine uptake to prevent a resurgence of these infections. This will also prevent increasing further the numbers of patients requiring health services, as well as outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, and allow us to provide important protection to children and other vulnerable groups. Where possible, the routine immunisation programmes should be...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Horáčková K, Ševčovičová A, Hrstka Z, Wichsová J, Zaviš M Abstract The main objective of this study is to describe the most common childhood diseases occurring in the Theresienstadt ghetto during the Second World War as well as applied anti-epidemic measures. A partial objective is to describe medical and nursing care of sick child prisoners. The data was obtained by the method of synthesis of primary and secondary data with the highest importance after adequate external source criticism using selected monographs, memoirs, survivor diaries, Orders of the day by ...
Source: Central European Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Cent Eur J Public Health Source Type: research
Suphanchaimat On 22 March 2019 the Thai Department of Disease Control (DDC) was notified that 16 workers, including Thai and Myanmar migrant workers, from two factories located in Nakhon Phathom Province, had presented with a fever with rash during the previous 2 weeks. Active case finding was conducted among workers in both factories using face-to-face interviews. Suspected cases were defined as a worker who developed fever with rash with one of the following symptoms: cough, coryza or conjunctivitis. Testing for measles IgM antibodies and viral identification through throat swabs by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
This week ’s Global Vaccine Summit comes at a crucial point in history. Governments must not miss their chance to save livesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGro Harlem Brundtland is former director-general of the World Health OrganizationElizabeth Cousens is president of the UN FoundationGoogle any list of the most successful public health interventions of this century or the last, and vaccines will be at the very top. Infectious diseases such as smallpox, measles, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) were once prevalent and killed indiscriminately. Smallpox is now eradicated, po...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science World Health Organization Polio World news Source Type: news
Fewer children are getting vaccinated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and the COVID-19 pandemic is almost certainly going to make matters worse, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) says. If the trend continues, it could trigger a resurgence in deadly childhood diseases such as polio, chickenpox, measles, yellow fever, hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and meningitis.
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Jeffrey A. SingerAs I recently wrotehere, and spoke abouthere, bans on elective surgery invoked by governors across the country in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused many people to suffer and even possibly face fatal consequences due to delays in necessary medical care. But there are other reasons why the public health emergency has the potential to generate secondary public health crises.In some cases people are avoiding doctors ’ offices and emergency rooms because they worry about handling theexpense at a time they have seen their income, and perhaps their savings, vanish during the current ec...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Abstract A 25-year-old medical student presented in Multan, Pakistan with a high fever, cough, myalgia, and diarrhea consistent with the typical signs and symptoms of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The patient had traveled to high COVID-19-risk areas within Pakistan and had no significant medical and surgical history. Based on nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swab testing, the patient was found to be negative for COVID-19. He subsequently developed a diffuse rash and had serology consistent with dengue and measles. The patient was treated symptomatically, and his condition gradually improved over 7 days. Th...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
[Cameroon Tribune] In their 14th Congress in Buea, they underlined the need for government to assist them.
Source: AllAfrica News: Polio - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Even before the pandemic, many parents rejected readily available, safe and effective immunizations that can protect their children.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Children and Childhood Parenting Measles Mumps Whooping Cough Freedom of Religion Source Type: news
GPs worried thousands may delay routine appointments due to fear of catching coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSenior doctors fear that thousands of routine vaccination appointments may be missed or delayed because of the coronavirus lockdown, raising the risk of sudden and potentially fatal outbreaks of other diseases when restrictions on movement are finally eased.GPs and accident and emergency departments have witnessedunprecedented falls in the numbers of people seeking medical care in recent weeks, prompting concerns that vital routine immunisations for infections such as mea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Society Science Medical research Source Type: news
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