Asthma and Food Allergy: Which Risks?

Asthma and Food Allergy: Which Risks? Medicina (Kaunas). 2019 Aug 21;55(9): Authors: di Palmo E, Gallucci M, Cipriani F, Bertelli L, Giannetti A, Ricci G Abstract Over the past few decades, an increase in the prevalence of asthma and food allergy has been observed in the pediatric population. In infants, food sensitization, particularly to egg, has increased the risk of developing allergic asthma. This is even more likely if sensitization to food allergens occurs early within the first few years of life. It is indeed known that both diseases may be present simultaneously in the pediatric population, but coexistence may negatively influence the severity of both conditions by increasing the risk of life-threatening asthmatic episodes as well as food-related anaphylaxis. Therefore, an accurate clinical and phenotype characterization of this high-risk group of children with both asthma and food allergy and a more aggressive management might lead to reducing related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to provide an updated overview on the close link between food allergy and asthma and their negative mutual influence. PMID: 31438462 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research

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Although atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with increased risk of food allergy (FA), this association is not fully understood and the predictors of severe FA are not clear. In a review of 18 population-controlled studies, the rate of food sensitization was up to 6 times higher in patients with AD versus normal controls.1 A recent study identified a potential physiologic mechanism by demonstrating increased skin barrier dysfunction, measured by increased transepidermal water loss and reduced skin filaggrin levels, in patients with AD and FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Alpha-gal allergy is associated with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to galactose- α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), a carbohydrate found in beef, pork, and lamb. First described in the adult population in 2009 by Commins et al., this syndrome is associated with delayed anaphylaxis, angioedema, and urticaria with symptom onset 3 to 6 hours after eating red meat.1,2,3 Bites from ticks, namely the Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum) in the United States, are associated with production of IgE antibodies to alpha-gal, resulting in an immune system primed to react to foods containing the antigen in patients who previously ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized allergies health onetime syndication Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Wheat, fruits with or without PFAS, and crustaceans are important and frequent causative allergens in Korean adult FA; these allergens differ from those found in childhood FA. It is notable that non-classic allergies, such as PFAS, FDEIA, and α-Gal allergy, are the important causes of anaphylaxis in Korean adult FA. PMID: 31332982 [PubMed]
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
Food allergies have a tremendous financial effect on families and society in general, with 8% of families reporting food allergy with a direct medical cost of $4.3 billion.1 Food allergies are also the major risk factor for recurrent emergency department visits for anaphylaxis.2 Therefore, treatment of food allergy and preventing severe reactions are major goals in the allergy community for physicians, patients, and families. One of the major questions in the treatment of food allergy is whether to prescribe oral immunotherapy (OIT).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewOral immunotherapy (OIT) can have a major positive impact on patients with IgE-mediated food allergies, increasing reaction thresholds and reducing the need for dietary and lifestyle limitations. However, patients experience more frequent allergic reactions during OIT than when following dietary avoidance, and 10 –75% of patients on OIT may experience anaphylaxis to treatment doses. Our ability to identify patients at higher risk of more severe or frequent reactions during OIT is limited. We review the current data available and highlight the gaps in knowledge which impede our ability to pred...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions: In asthma and allergy, multimorbidity and polypharmacy are major concerns. Disease severity, drug use, and costs increased with multimorbid conditions. To reduce the burden, allergy management should be better integrated and more comprehensive.Int Arch Allergy Immunol
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Food allergy (FA) affects nearly 8% of children in the United States.1 Approximately 16% to 18% of children have experienced an allergic reaction at school,2,3 and 25% of first-time anaphylactic reactions occur at school.4 Children with FA believe that peer support decreases risk-taking and promotes safety.5 Peer education may be effective in improving FA knowledge among children, because of legitimized content by peers, whom children often trust over adults at this age.6 It also may improve the safety of children with FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Food allergy (FA) affects nearly 8% of children in the United States.1 Approximately 16-18% of children have experienced an allergic reaction at school,2,3 and 25% of first-time anaphylactic reactions occur at school.4 Children with FA feel that peer support decreases risk-taking and promotes safety.5 Peer education may be effective in improving FA knowledge among children, due to legitimized content by peers, whom children often trust over adults at this age.6 It may also improve the safety of children with FA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
The recognition that immunoglobulin E (IgE), formerly known as reagin, is central to the pathogenesis of allergic disease dates back nearly a century to the seminal work of Prausnitz and Kustner. By contrast, IgG4 represents an antibody subclass that is often increased in the setting of allergic disease but whose role in disease pathogenesis is less clear.1 Reports in the 1980s suggested that allergen-specific IgG4 could play a role as an anaphylactic antibody, but subsequent research cast significant doubt on this possibility.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
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