Reply to “Down Syndrome Cognitive Marker's Significance in Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia Management”

Publication date: Available online 23 August 2019Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Carla M. Startin, Sarah Hamburg, Rosalyn Hithersay, Tamara Al-Janabi, Kin Y. Mok, John Hardy, Andre Strydom
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 20 September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Ríona Mc Ardle, Brook Galna, Paul Donaghy, Alan Thomas, Lynn RochesterAbstractObjectiveWe aimed to refine the hypothesis that dementia has a unique signature of gait impairment reflective of underlying pathology by considering two dementia subtypes, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy body disease (LBD), and exploring the role of cognition in disease-specific gait impairments.BackgroundAccurately differentiating AD and LBD is important for treatment and disease management. Early evidence suggests gait could be a marker of d...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Current state of knowledge makes the usage of cholesterol markers of cognitive decline in clinical practice impossible. PMID: 31530269 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Aging Science - Category: Geriatrics Tags: Curr Aging Sci Source Type: research
In clinical practice “Doctor, do I have dementia?” is an increasingly common question, but one that is often difficult to answer.  Accurate diagnosis is the first step in managing someone with cognitive concerns. Early diagnosis of a cognitive syndrome, if present, can allow people to make sense of their symptoms, and can help people plan their future, while allowing access to treatments and support.To mark World Alzheimer's Day on September 21, theCochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group have brought together all the completed test accuracy reviews focusing on cognitive screening tests and questi...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
Publication date: September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &Dementia, Volume 15, Issue 9Author(s):
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &Dementia, Volume 15, Issue 9Author(s):
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &Dementia, Volume 15, Issue 9Author(s):
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &Dementia, Volume 15, Issue 9Author(s):
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &Dementia, Volume 15, Issue 9Author(s): Alzheimer's
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2019Source: Alzheimer's &Dementia, Volume 15, Issue 9Author(s): Sam Gandy, Toshiharu Suzuki
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
“Get out! Get out!” My wife, Joan, having just woken up, was screaming, and hitting out wildly at the stranger in her bed. She was in a panic, her body shaking with fright. “Get away from here. Get out!” The man she perceived as a stranger was me, her husband of more than forty years. Joan was eight years into the destructive course of atypical early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, a horrific disorder that ravaged her, leaving her blind and with serious dementia. At that moment, she was experiencing something called Capgras Syndrome, in which patients become deluded that those close to them and the...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Books health ideas Source Type: news
More News: Alzheimer's | Dementia | Geriatrics