Reduction in PTSD Symptoms Linked to Decrease in T2DM

Patients with clinically meaningful reduction in PTSD Checklist score less likely to develop type 2 diabetes
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

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(Reuters Health) - Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who improve with treatment may also lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a U.S. study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Conclusion: Our results indicate similar prevalence rates of comorbid psychiatric symptoms to studies carried out in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and relatively high attendance and referral rates to psychiatric services.Implications: The results shed light on the clinical profile of patients in this region and support the need for integrated collaborative medical services. Moreover, findings have important implications for health care policies pertaining to resource distribution and funding.IntroductionMedical care has traditionally been dominated by a separation between disciplines catering to physiologi...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study aimed to explore the potential moderating effect of mindfulness and its facets on the relationships among perceived stress and mental health outcomes (burnout, depression, anxiety, and subjective well-being) among Chinese intensive care nurses. A total of 500 Chinese intensive care nurses completed self-report measures of mindfulness, burnout syndromes, perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and subjective well-being. Correlation and hierarchical multiple regressions were applied for data analysis. Mindfulness moderated the effects of perceived stress on emotional exhaustion (the core component of burnout syndro...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
  Answer: No—unless you do it for more than a few months. After a few months, the upfront metabolic and weight benefits will begin to reverse and new health problems arise. We know this with confidence. I raise this question once again because more and more people are coming to me reporting problems. It may take months, even years, but the long-term consequences can be quite serious. Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is—without a doubt—an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, redu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ketones bowel flora ketogenic ketotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Veterans with PTSD had higher rates of smoking, depression, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, but no single condition explained the association between PTSD and heart disease, a new study found.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Introduction to the Theme "New Therapeutic Targets". Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol. 2019 Jan 06;59:15-20 Authors: Insel PA, Amara SG, Blaschke TF, Meyer UA Abstract "New Therapeutic Targets" is the theme of articles in the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Volume 59. Reviews in this volume discuss targets for a variety of conditions in need of new therapies, including type 2 diabetes, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, obesity, thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, tinnitus, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, pain, depre...
Source: Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol Source Type: research
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an often chronic condition, affecting health across the lifespan. A growing body of evidence supports links between PTSD and common age-related health conditions, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD).1-3 In addition to direct effects on diabetes and CVD risk, PTSD may augment diabetes-related CVD risk. Diabetes comorbid with depression is more strongly associated with CVD morbidity and mortality than either condition alone,4 particularly among women.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Obesity mediated the subsequent risk for type 2 diabetes in these individuals
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
This cohort study assesses a veteran population with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to determine if obesity can account for the increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in patients with PTSD.
Source: JAMA Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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