Polysaccharides constructed hydrogels as vehicles for proteins and peptides. A review

Publication date: 1 December 2019Source: Carbohydrate Polymers, Volume 225Author(s): Ecaterina Stela Dragan, Maria Valentina DinuAbstractMacromolecular drugs, such as proteins and peptides, are lately readily available and used in the treatment of diseases including diabetes and cancer, as well as in therapies such as gene therapy, wound dressing, and tissue engineering. However, the bioavailability, the extent and the rate at which these drugs reach the target tissue are highly dependent on the carrier and on the route of administration. Among the multitude of biocompatible polymers used to design vehicles for macromolecular drugs, polysaccharides are preferred due to their mucoadhesive, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. This review aims to give an overview on the evolution of polysaccharide-based vehicles recommended in the controlled delivery of proteins and peptides, mainly reported in the last five years. Both physically and chemically cross-linked drug delivery systems are presented such as: porous hydrogels, polyelectrolyte complexes and layer-by-layer thin films. Even if the pharmaceutical formulations for oral administration of proteins and peptides are preferred, other friendly routes are discussed in this review, such as transdermal delivery.
Source: Carbohydrate Polymers - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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