Medical News Today: Study links insomnia genes to heart disease, stroke risk

New research using a genetic analysis called Mendelian randomization links insomnia genes to a greater risk of heart disease and stroke.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

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Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
Being an early bird, sleeping seven to eight hours a night, having no insomnia, not snoring and not being sleepy during the day were tied to better cardiovascular health.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Sleep Heart Genetics and Heredity Stroke Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 6, 2019 -- Sleep problems could increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and other heart and brain diseases, a new study suggests. It included 487,200 people in China, average age 51, with no history of stroke or heart disease....
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Insomnia may raise the risk of cardiovascular disease, heart failure and stroke. For the study, the researchers looked at data from multiple studies for 1.3 million people with and without heart disease and stroke.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of stroke and coronary artery diseasePeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news
People genetically predisposed to sleep problems have greater risk of heart failure and stroke, say researchersPeople who struggle with sleep might be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular problems, research suggests.Scientists have found that people who are genetically predisposed to insomnia have a greater risk of heart failure, stroke and coronary artery disease.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sleep Health & wellbeing Life and style Science Heart disease Stroke UK news Society Source Type: news
In conclusion, e-noise is a potential danger in our world, and further studies are needed of its effects on mechanisms of aging, disease, and human health.
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. Modafinil is a central nervous system stimulant with well-established effectiveness in the treatment of narcolepsy and shift-work sleep disorder. There is conflicting evidence about the benefits of modafinil in the treatment of fatigue and EDS secondary to TBI. One randomized, controlled study states that modafinil does not significantly improve patient wakefulness, while another concludes that modafinil corrects EDS but not fatigue. An observational study provides evidence that modafinil increases alertness in fatigued patients with past medical history of brainstem diencephalic stroke or multiple scleros...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review excessive daytime sleep fatigue head injury modafinil stroke TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: research
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