Primary prevention of ischaemic heart disease: populations, individuals, and health professionals

Publication date: 24–30 August 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 394, Issue 10199Author(s): Rajeev Gupta, David A WoodSummaryIschaemic heart disease has a multifactorial aetiology and can be prevented from developing in populations primordially, and in individuals at high risk by primary prevention. The primordial approach focuses on social determinants of health in populations: political, economic, and social factors, principally unplanned urbanisation, illiteracy, poverty, and working and living conditions. Implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals can lead to major improvements in cardiovascular health, and adequate health-care financing and universal health care are important for achieving these goals. Population-level interventions should focus on tobacco control, promotion of healthy foods (fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts), curbing unhealthy foods (saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates, excessive salt, and alcohol), promotion of physical activity in everyday living, and control of ambient and indoor pollution. At the individual level, identification of people at high multifactorial risk and guideline-driven management of hypertension, LDL cholesterol, and diabetes is required. Strategies to improve adherence to healthy lifestyles and drug therapies are essential and can be implemented at health system, health care, and patient levels with use of education, technology, and personalised approaches. Improving quality of medical education w...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
Hongfei Gu1†, Shuang Shao2†, Jie Liu3,4,5, Zhenqian Fan2, Yu Chen2, Jingxian Ni3,4,5, Conglin Wang6, Jun Tu3,4,5, Xianjia Ning3,4,5, Yongzhong Lou1*, Bin Li1* and Jinghua Wang3,4,5* 1Department of Neurology, Tianjin Haibin People's Hospital, Tianjin, China 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China 3Department of Neurology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, China 4Laboratory of Epidemiology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin, China 5Key Laboratory of Post-Neuroinjury Neuro-Repair and Regeneration i...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 April 2019Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): Nishat Fatima, Tulika Chandra, Abbas Ali Mahdi, Devisha AgarwalAbstractBackgroundHyperlipidemia can be caused by abnormal elevation of lipids and lipoproteins in the blood. This increased can lead to heart disease. Risks which can be controlled include alcohol intake, physical activity, smoking, high blood pressure and genetic factors. Markers of increased cardiovascular risk appear to be lower in regular blood donor compared with single time donors as reflected by significantly lower total cho...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Geng-Hong Xia1†, Chao You1,2†, Xu-Xuan Gao1, Xiu-Li Zeng1, Jia-Jia Zhu1, Kai-Yu Xu3, Chu-Hong Tan1, Ruo-Ting Xu1, Qi-Heng Wu1, Hong-Wei Zhou3, Yan He4*‡ and Jia Yin1*‡ 1Department of Neurology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Neurology, The First People's Hospital of Zunyi, Zunyi, China 3State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China 4Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical Univ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Emilio Rodríguez-Castro1,2, Manuel Rodríguez-Yáñez1,2, Susana Arias1,2, María Santamaría1,2, Iria López-Dequidt1,2, Ignacio López-Loureiro1, Manuel Rodríguez-Pérez1, Pablo Hervella1, Tomás Sobrino1, Francisco Campos1, José Castillo1* and Ramón Iglesias-Rey1* 1Clinical Neurosciences Research Laboratory, Department of Neurology, Clinical University Hospital, Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain2Stroke Unit, Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Santiago...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study shows that a higher burden of liver steatosis seems to be associated with less severe stroke and better functional outcome after ischemic stroke or TIA. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis with varying degree of fibrosis, and liver cirrhosis (1, 2). NAFLD is becoming the most common chronic liver disease worldwide including Korea, affecting approximately 25% of the general population (3, 4). NAFLD is closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and is even recognized as ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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