Why Diet Sodas Aren't the Answer for Your Sugary Drink Cravings

THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 2019 -- The health risks of sugary drinks, from juice to soda, are well known. They can lead to overweight and diabetes, stroke and other problems in the brain, including poorer memory and smaller brain volume. But diet sodas...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(Reuters Health) - Severely injured patients are more likely to have complications or die if they have a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors like high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: JACC: Heart FailureAuthor(s): Milton PackerAbstractBoth obesity and type 2 diabetes are important risk factors for the development of heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and both disorders increase the risk of systemic thromboembolic events. Traditionally, the risk of stroke has been explained by the strong association of these disorders with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, adiposity and diabetes are risk factors for systemic thromboembolism, even in the absence of AF, because both can lead to the development of an inflammatory and fibrotic ...
Source: JACC: Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE: Efforts that prevent adverse childhood experiences could also potentially prevent adult chronic conditions, depression, health risk behaviors, and negative socioeconomic outcomes. States can use comprehensive public health approaches derived from the best available evidence to prevent childhood adversity before it begins. By creating the conditions for healthy communities and focusing on primary prevention, it is possible to reduce risk for adverse childhood experiences while also mitigating consequences for those already affected by these experiences. PMID: 316...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Conditions:   Hypertension;   Diabetes;   Obesity;   COPD;   CHF;   High Cholesterol;   Asthma;   Chronic Pain;   Multiple Sclerosis;   Depression;   Anxiety;   Heart Diseases;   Stroke Interventions:   Behavioral: HeRe We Arts;   Behavioral: HeRe We Ed Sponsors:   The Cleveland Clinic;   National Endowment for the Arts;   Cuyahoga Arts and Culture Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
The 2010 census estimated that 3.6 million Americans use a wheeled mobility device, such as a manual wheelchair, motorized wheelchair, or scooter. This number is projected to be four times higher by 2020. Individuals who use wheeled mobility devices often experience poorer health outcomes compared to the general population. There are some distinct health challenges related to the physical effects of long-term wheelchair use, such as shoulder overuse injuries, skin breakdown, and urinary tract disorders. Wheelchair users may also encounter barriers to accessing preventive health care and getting sufficient physical activity...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
This study is also a reminder that the health impact of a particular intervention (such as diet) may not be easy to predict or explain. In most cases, the risk of stroke and heart disease tend to rise or fall together, but that wasn’t the case in this research. Beware the study’s limitations This study linking a vegetarian diet with a higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke has a number of important limitations that should temper the concerns of vegetarians. The study was observational. That means it simply observed what happened among different people who followed different diets over time, without being able to ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
by Jenny C. Censin, Sanne A. E. Peters, Jonas Bovijn, Teresa Ferreira, Sara L. Pulit, Reedik M ägi, Anubha Mahajan, Michael V. Holmes, Cecilia M. Lindgren Obesity traits are causally implicated with risk of cardiometabolic diseases. It remains unclear whether there are similar causal effects of obesity traits on other non-communicable diseases. Also, it is largely unexplored whether there are any sex-specific differences in the causal effects of obe sity traits on cardiometabolic diseases and other leading causes of death. We constructed sex-specific genetic risk scores (GRS) for three obesity traits; body mass index...
Source: PLoS Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
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