Cornea Specialists Do Not Recommend Routine Usage of Topical Anesthetics for Corneal Abrasions

Publication date: September 2019Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 74, Issue 3Author(s): Michele D. Lee, Todd H. Driver, Gerami D. Seitzman
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Standardized ocular protection, reporting, and education initiatives were found to maximally decrease rates of perioperative corneal abrasions after nonocular surgery. However, no gold standard currently exists for intraoperative ocular protection. More research needs to be conducted on specific prevention strategies and content of educational initiatives in hopes of standard development across facilities nationwide.
Source: Cornea - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionsAlthough not representing a causal relationship, these data suggest that surgical factors may have a greater role than demographic characteristics or other clinical factors in the development of perioperative ocular injury. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and patients should be aware of the increased risk of ocular injury that accompanies longer, more extensive spine operations.
Source: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTotal patient care is of extreme importance during the administration of anesthesia. Proper care of the eye is necessary during all anesthetic administrations, especially during the administration of general anesthesia or monitored anesthesia care. By paying attention to details, the likelihood of an occurrence of eye injuries is reduced.Recent FindingsThough perioperative eye injuries are rare during general anesthesia, they do account for 2 –3% of claims against anesthesiologists. Ocular injuries may occur during general anesthesia even when tape has been utilized for eye closure. Corneal a...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Although not representing a causal relationship, these data suggest that surgical factors may have a greater role than demographic characteristics or other clinical factors in the development of perioperative ocular injury. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and patients should be aware of the increased risk of ocular injury that accompanies longer, more extensive spine operations. PMID: 30790199 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Can J Anaesth Source Type: research
​The slit lamp is a straightforward and user-friendly machine designed to make ocular exams easy. All the buttons, knobs, and lights, however, can be intimidating. This should not dissuade practitioners from getting cozy, driving the joystick, and evaluating ocular issues.An ED slit lamp with an LED light and magnification power up to 40x. Photo by M. Roberts.ED slit lamps are designed to be a bit more basic in function than those found in an ophthalmologist's office. Many EDs may house more complex machinery, but the vast majority of microscope and light arm combination is set at one length with one lens and one to two ...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
​A 32-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of eye pain and decreased vision. He worked for the city and was removing rust and graffiti from a wall with a power washer when the spray ricocheted off the surface and into his eye. He presented with a bottle of the chemical he used, which contained hydrofluoric acid (HF) and other chemicals. He rinsed his eyes with tap water, but experienced persistent decreased vision and pain in both eyes. His exam was remarkable for bilateral injected conjunctiva and excessive tearing.More than 7,000 ocular exposures were reported to U.S. poison control centers pe...
Source: The Tox Cave - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
​Identifying and managing disease often requires the delicate and skillful use of temperamental emergency department machinery. The ability to apply these may appropriately help determine a difficult diagnosis.Glaucoma, we all know, can cause blindness, and acute narrow angle glaucoma refers to the angles within the eye that are not as wide and open as normal. People with acute angle glaucoma have abnormal anatomy within the eye where the angle changes as the eye is dilated. This can cause blockages of fluid drainage from the anterior to posterior changes resulting in increased intraocular pressure. It ca lead to acute a...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Objective: To validate best practices in patients undergoing robotic surgeries as impacting ocular morbidity, particularly corneal abrasions and corneal edema. A safety initiative between the department of Women's Health and Anesthesia was designed to reduce a trend in ocular injuries noted in robotic surgeries.
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito do "cross-linking" corneano na ceratopatia bolhosa sintom ática e seu impacto na acuidade visual, espessura corneana e sintomatologia dolorosa. MÉTODOS: Doze pacientes com ceratopatia bolhosa sintomática foram incluídos. Exame clínico com questionário específico para a pesquisa com escala de dor (escala visual analógica numérica), acuidade visual e mensuração da espessura corneana foi realizada pré "cross-linking" corneano, 7, 30 e 60 dias após. Em todos os pacientes o tratamento com UVA...
Source: Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia - Category: Opthalmology Source Type: research
​The hair or thread tourniquet syndrome is a relatively rare condition that has evaded me in the emergency department for several decades, until past year when three cases showed up over six months. This condition has been around for as long as there has been hair or thread and body appendages. In fact, this condition may have first been described in the 1600s. (J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2005;18[3]:155.)The etiology of this condition seems almost unbelievable. How in the world does a hair get wrapped repeatedly and tightly around an appendage of the body? Some authors expressed the need to consider nonaccidental etiologi...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
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