A Societal Sleep Prescription

Publication date: 21 August 2019Source: Neuron, Volume 103, Issue 4Author(s): Matthew P. WalkerWe are suffering a global sleep-loss epidemic. The health consequences within an individual are well characterized. But does society suffer just as much? Here, I discuss how insufficient sleep erodes our societal fabric as much as it does our biological fabric, and offer some prescriptive remedies.
Source: Neuron - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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By STUART H. SMITH Imagine a massive public health crisis in the United States that affects tens of thousands of people. Now imagine that the government had a simple tool at its disposal that could prevent this kind of physical and psychological trauma. You might think that I’m writing about America’s deadly outbreak of gun violence, which has made headlines this summer from Dayton to El Paso. But actually I’m talking about a different crisis that affects even more people – all of them children — and which could be sharply reduced with one simple step that lacks the bitter political anim...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Patients Big pharma NAS syndrome Opioid Justice Team Opioid-Dependent Babies Opioids public health Stuart Smith Source Type: blogs
ConclusionPeople with dementia living in the community were found to be physically inactive. This study has displayed that increased levels of physical activity can show signs of an improved self-perceived quality of life. This study was a correlational study and causality was not investigated. The association we have identified may provide support and foundation for future studies that explore causal components.
Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Abstract Nearly 50% of physicians report symptoms of clinical burnout. Occupational factors and personal health play a substantial role in physician burnout. The role of sleep in physician burnout is not well understood. Burnout is at epidemic levels in healthcare, with research suggesting nearly 1 in 2 physicians experience clinical burnout as defined by the Maslach Burnout Index. Sleep deprivation, burnout, and clinician health are intricately intertwined. The relationship between sleep deprivation and burnout is not only suggested in hypothetical models, but also confirmed in observational studies of workers of...
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
When someone sets out to improve their health, they usually take a familiar path: starting a healthy diet, adopting a new workout regimen, getting better sleep, drinking more water. Each of these behaviors is important, of course, but they all focus on physical health—and a growing body of research suggests that social health is just as, if not more, important to overall well-being. One recent study published in the journal PLOS ONE, for example, found that the strength of a person’s social circle—as measured by inbound and outbound cell phone activity—was a better predictor of self-reported stress,...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
No one silver bullet will end the epidemic of burnout among medical residents. However, addressing concerns related to sleep is the right place to start.Medscape Med Students
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Med Students Commentary Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Personalized Medicine UniverseAuthor(s): Minako Abe, Hiroyuki AbeAbstractLifestyle-related chronic illnesses, such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and dementia are rising at an alarming, epidemic rate. In this modern world of increasing lifespan, we are actually decreasing our health span, placing an undue burden on healthcare costs to society. Modern medicine has largely gotten away from addressing key issues to prevent or even reverse some of these chronic conditions. Yet the evidence for successful interventions in four key areas – nutrition, s...
Source: Personalized Medicine Universe - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
In a world of social companion robots, chatbots, or artificial intelligence buddies, adults have the responsibility to teach kids well how to live a healthy life with the available technologies, how to balance between the online and the offline world, how to keep their mental stability in the face of innovations. As it’s an awfully difficult job, we collected examples where digital health technology could help and in which areas should analog methods prevail. The land where kindergarteners play with the texture of raspberry When was the last time you paid attention to the crunching sounds while eating a raw ca...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers apps children cognitive health digital health digital literacy eating fitness health apps health literacy healthy eating healthy lifestyle Innovation kids mental health physical Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Keeping a lot of light on while you snooze — such as from a television or bright nightlight — has been linked with an increased risk of weight gain and obesity. Specifically, sleeping with a television or light on in the room was positively associated with gaining five kilograms, or 11 pounds, over a five-year period among women in a new study published in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine on Monday. “There was a 17% chance of gaining the five kilograms — after we adjusted for confounding factors,” said Dale Sandler, a senior investigator at the National Institute of Env...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Offbeat CNN Sleep Source Type: news
Conclusions: The use of antidepressants, especially SNRIs, was associated with a shorter survival time of sCJD patients. The possible changes in neurotransmitters should be emphasized. Scientifically, this study may provide insights into the mechanism of CJD. Clinically, it may contribute to the early diagnosis of CJD.IntroductionDepression is common in the elderly. Its prevalence rate is as high as 11.19%, and this increases progressively with worsening cognitive impairment (1). The presence of depression is an acknowledged risk factor for dementia (2); it can even double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (3, 4)...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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