Qualitative Investigation of the Speech-Language Therapy Experiences of Individuals who Covertly Stutter

ConclusionThe evidence suggests individualized therapy based on each client’s unique manifestation of covert stuttering is beneficial; while, fluency-focused stuttering therapy is often incongruent with the needs of persons who covertly stutter. Therapeutic implications and recommendations for speech-language pathologists are discussed.
Source: Journal of Fluency Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conclusions Combining our own data with human and animal neurophysiological evidence from other laboratories, we interpret the overall findings as suggesting that (a) speech movement planning modulates auditory processing in a manner that may optimize its tuning characteristics for monitoring feedback during speech production and, (b) in conditions with typical auditory feedback, adults who stutter do not appropriately modulate the auditory system prior to speech onset. Lack of modulation of speakers who stutter may lead to maladaptive feedback-driven movement corrections that manifest themselves as repetitive movements or...
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
Conclusion These results point to aberrant development of cortical areas involved in integrating sensory feedback with speech movements in CWS and differences in interhemispheric connectivity between the two motor cortices. Furthermore, developmental trajectories in these areas seem to diverge between persistent and recovered cases. PMID: 31465710 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
Conclusions Results reveal a nontrivial tendency for AWS to experience decreased positive affect compared to AWNS. In addition, increased frustration was found to be associated with reduced general knowledge about stuttering in AWS. Neither effect has been previously reported for adults or children who stutter. Finally, self-reported temperament traits were not found to vary with stuttering frequency in adults, consistent with previous results for AWS. PMID: 31318628 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
Discussion Results suggest that AWS, compared to ANS, engage higher levels of parasympathetic control (i.e., RSA) during speaking, regardless of stress level. Higher levels of self-reported state and trait anxiety support this view point and suggest that anxiety may have an indirect role on articulatory variability in AWS. PMID: 31265363 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: Participant improvement and positive self-reports suggest a potentially promising effect of combining ACT with stuttering modification therapy. Further research is needed to evaluate treatment efficacy.Folia Phoniatr Logop
Source: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Conclusions iGlebe is a promising individualized treatment for social anxiety for adults who stutter and offers a viable and inexpensive alternative to in-clinic CBT with clinical psychologists. An issue to emerge from this trial, which requires clarification during future clinical trials of iGlebe, is the posttreatment relation between percentage of syllables stuttered and self-reported stuttering severity ratings. PMID: 31112442 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
As a speech-language pathologist who works with preschool children who stutter, I often hear the same questions from parents: Is there anything I can do to improve my child’s chance of outgrowing stuttering? Although stuttering is not caused by ways parents interact with their child, I can certainly recommend interaction strategies for SLPs to share with parents of their clients or students. Parents can incorporate these supports at the guidance of their SLP once their child starts showing signs of childhood-onset stuttering. These five tips allow parents to support their child in facilitating confident verbal expres...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Early Intervention Fluency Disorders Speech Disorders stuttering Source Type: blogs
Pediatric speech-language pathologists often get asked about toy recommendations for young children. It makes sense because we often use toys in sessions to keep children engaged in learning. So, which toys should we recommend to parents? A recent study by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) compared traditional toys to electronic toys. The report concludes—not surprisingly—that traditional toys result in better child-caregiver interactions. These interactions provide multiple communication-learning opportunities. So how can we help parents look beyond advertising  that promises toys will teach childr...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Early Intervention Language Disorders Speech Disorders stuttering Source Type: blogs
Conducting a science fair project on stuttering can provide an outstanding opportunity for students to experience empowerment when it comes to their speech. As we launch into National Stuttering Awareness Week, I want to share the story of a student who did just that. Last year, Jacob, a brilliant 12-year-old, elected to do his science fair project on the experiences of people—like himself—who stutter. He researched the disorder online, consulted with me and other university faculty, designed his own survey, and distributed it to hundreds of adults who stutter. Many of those adults rushed to provide feedback to...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Fluency Disorders stuttering Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Recent publications from Kefalianos et al. (2017) and Leech, Bernstein Ratner, Brown, and Weber (2017) added to previous information that gender and language ability (or language growth) may be related to children's recovery from stuttering. The conclusions from both studies are difficult to interpret, however, because neither incorporated two factors known to influence children's recovery: a family history of recovery and, especially, the type and timing of treatment. Consideration of these two articles therefore raises multiple empirical, theoretical, and clinical issues that deserve to be fully addressed if ...
Source: Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: J Speech Lang Hear Res Source Type: research
More News: Education | Environmental Health | Pathology | Speech Therapy | Speech-Language Pathology | Stammer | Study | Universities & Medical Training