Low-Dose Subcutaneous Anti-CD20 Treatment Depletes Disease Relevant B Cell Subsets and Attenuates Neuroinflammation

AbstractTo explore the B cell depleting capacity of a low-dose (20  μg) subcutaneous mouse anti-CD20 antibody treatment on disease-relevant B cell populations within lymph nodes and the spleen. B cell depleting capacity was explored in healthy female C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice; following immune activation in two different mouse models: trinitrophenylated lipopolysac charide model (thymus-independent response) and dinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin model (thymus-dependent response); and in a chronic neuroinflammation experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model. CD20 protein expression on B cell subpopulations was also studied. The subcutaneous anti-CD20 regimen resulted in rapid depletion of B cells in blood, lymph nodes and spleen. Low-dose subcutaneous treatment did not reduce antigen-specific immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G titers in all subgroups, and relatively spared splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells in both T cell dependent and T cel l independent B cell immunization models. Analysis of immune compartments during anti-CD20-modulated autoimmune neuroinflammation showed that the maximal B cell depletion was achieved within 2 days of treatment and was highest in the lymph node. Regardless of the tissues analyzed, low-dose subcutan eous treatment was characterized by rapid B cell repletion following treatment cessation. CD20 protein expression was consistent on all B cell subsets in blood, and was more pronounced in germinal center B cells of lymph...
Source: Journal of NeuroImmune Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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Purpose of review Immunocompromised children are a largely under-vaccinated population and are vulnerable to acquiring vaccine-preventable infections (VPIs). A variety of factors contribute to poor vaccine coverage including: severity of underlying illness, sporadic contact with primary care physicians, and lack of awareness among specialty providers regarding vaccination status. In this review, we report recent data regarding incidence of VPIs, new approaches to vaccine use, rates of vaccine coverage, and strategies to optimize vaccine administration in immunocompromised populations. Recent findings Pediatric transpl...
Source: Current Opinion in Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Tags: INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND IMMUNIZATION: Edited by Grace Lee Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The use of an immunosuppressive drug started after the administration of the YFV did not affect long-term persistence of NA. A second dose of YFV may be necessary to secure long-term immunity. PMID: 31911033 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
The authors present a rare case of sudden onset unilateral complete ptosis occurring hours after administration of the H1N1 influenza vaccine. A complete workup for autoimmune and neurological disease was negative. MRI of the orbits demonstrated unilateral orbital myositis involving the left superior rectus/levator complex, superior oblique, and medial rectus muscles. Ptosis resolved spontaneously over 2 months without intervention. An autoimmune mechanism may explain rare cases of orbital myositis following administration of the H1N1 influenza vaccination. A case of acute onset and spontaneous resolution of complete unil...
Source: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort vaccination coverage for hexavalent and MMR vaccinations was good, but insufficient for VZV vaccination in patients born before 2005. Neither the vaccination certificate nor the history of chicken pox is reliable to predict VZV immunity indicating a need for serologic investigations and if needed vaccination before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. PMID: 31879123 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
UCLA scientists have discovered one reason why autoimmune diseases are more prevalent in women than in men. While males inherit their mother ’s X chromosome and father’s Y chromosome, females inherit X chromosomes from both parents. New research, which shows differences in how each of those X chromosomes is regulated, suggests that the X chromosome that females get from their father may help to explain their more active immune system .“It’s been known for many years that women are more susceptible to autoimmune diseases than men are,” said lead study author Dr. Rhonda Voskuhl, a UCLA professor...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Today's paper is authored by the Covalent Bioscience science team, and is an overview of the science underlying their catalytic antibody (or catabody) approach to clearing amyloids of various sorts from aged tissues. It isn't open access, unfortunately, but the paper is, as usual, available to the world thanks to the ethical civil disobedience of the Sci-Hub team. Amyloids are solid deposits formed by one of the very small number of proteins in the body that can become misfolded or otherwise altered in ways that cause other molecules of the same protein to also alter in the same way. These errant proteins aggregate into st...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
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Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news
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Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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